Canadian Speaker (Appointment of Deputy) Act, 1895, Session 2

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Canadian Speaker (Appointment of Deputy) Act, 1895, Session 2
A technical act which confirmed the validity of another law regarding the Deputy Speaker of the Senate.

Notes: This Act was repealed by the Constitution Act, 1982

Contents[edit]

Canadian Speaker (Appointment of Deputy) Act, 1895, Session 2

1. Confirmation of Canadian Act with respect to Speaker of Senate.
2. Short title.


59 Victoria, c. 3 (U.K.)


An Act for removing Doubts as to the Validity of an Act passed by the Parliament of the Dominion of Canada respecting the Deputy-Speaker of the Senate


[Assented to 5th September, 1895.]


Whereas the Parliament of Canada have passed an Act intituled An Act respecting the Speaker of the Senate, and providing for the appointment of a deputy during the illness or absence of the Speaker of the Senate, and containing a suspending clause to the effect that the Act should nor come into force until Her Majesty's pleasure thereon has been signified by proclamation in the Canada Gazette:

And whereas doubts have arisen as to the power of the Parliament of Canada to pass that Act, and it is expedient to remove those doubts:

Be it therefore enacted by the Queen's most Excellent Majesty, by and with the advice and consent of the Lords Spiritual and Temporal, and Commons, in this present Parliament assembled, and by the authority of the same, as follows:
Confirmation of Canadian Act with respect to Speaker of Senate.
1. The Act of the Parliament of Canada passed in the session held in the fifty-seventh and fifty-eighth years of Her Majesty's reign, entitled An Act respecting the Speaker of the Senate, shall be deemed to be valid, and to have been valid, as from the date at which the royal assent was given thereto by the Governor-General of the Dominion of Canada.
Short title.
2. This Act may be cited as the Canadian Speaker (Appointment of Deputy) Act, 1889 Session 2.



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