Catholic Encyclopedia (1913)/Thmuis

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A titular see in Augustamnica Prima, suffragan of Pelusium; a city of Lower Egypt, on the canal east of the Nile, between its Tanitic and Mendesian branches. Herodotus (II, 166) gives it as the capital of a nome bearing its name, and Ptolemy as that of the Mendesian nome. In the fourth century it was still important, having its own administration and being exempt from the jurisdiction of the Prefect of Alexandria. It was in existence at the time of the Arabian conquest, and was later called Al-Mourad or Al-Mouradeh; it must have disappeared after the Turkish conquest. Its ruins are at Tell el-Meî, about five miles north-west of Senbelâouîn, a station on the railway from Zagazig to Mansoûrah. Le Quien ("Oriens Christ.", II, 537) names nine bishops of Thmuis, the last three being Monophysites of the Middle Ages. The others are St. Phileas, martyr (in the Martyrology, 4 Feb.); St. Donatus, his successor, martyr; Liberius (not Caius), at the Council of Nicæa in 325; St. Serapion, d. shortly before 360, the author of various works, in part preserved; Ptolemæus at the Council of Seleucia (359); Aristobulus, at the Council of Ephesus (431).

SMITH, Dict. Greek and Rom. geog., s. v.; DE ROUGÉ, Géog. ancienne de la Basse-Egypte (Paris, 1891); AMÉLINEAU, Géog. do l'Egypte à l'époque copte (Paris, 1893), 286, 500 sq.

S. Pétridès.