Catholic Encyclopedia (1913)/Tommaso Badia

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Cardinal, author, papal legate, born at Modena, 1483; died at Rome, 6 September, 1547. He entered the Dominican Order in his native city, soon excelled all his brethren in learning, and taught theology successively at Ferrara, Venice, and Rome. When Sylvester de Prierias was sent on a mission to the princes of Italy, Badia was chosen to fill, temporarily, the office of Master of the Sacred Palace, to which he succeeded permanently, probably in 1523. He was put on the commission which drew up the list of abuses to be reformed in the Council of Trent. He took part in the Diet of Worms (1540), not only as disputant, but also as theologian of Cardinal Contarini. On his return to Italy Paul III created him cardinal, and though selected as one of the legates to preside at Trent he was retained at Rome to examine the doctrinal and disciplinary memoranda drawn up in the sessions of the council. It was on his favourable recommendation and approval of its constitutions that Paul III confirmed the Society of Jesus. At his own desire he was buried in the Minerva beside Cardinal Cajetan. He is the author of several philosophical treatises, as well as works on Divine Providence, the immortality of the soul and several treatises against Luther, none of which have been published.

THOS. M. SCHWERTNER