China Philippines Communique Establishing Diplomatic Relations

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Joint Communique of the Government of the People's Republic of China and the Government of the Republic of the Philippines  (1975) 

The Government of the People's Republic of China and the Government of the Republic of the Philippines, desiring to promote the traditional friendship between the Chinese and the Filipino peoples, have decided upon mutual recognition and the establishment of diplomatic relations at ambassadorial level effective from the date of signature of this communique.


The two Governments hold that the economic, political and social system of a country should be chosen only by the people of that country, without outside interference. They maintain that the difference between the economic, political and social systems of the People's Republic of China and the Republic of the Philippines should not constitute an obstacle to peaceful co-existence and the establishment and development of peaceful and friendly relations between the two countries and peoples in accordance with the principles of mutual respect for sovereignty and territorial integrity, mutual non-aggression, non-interference in each other's internal affairs, equality and mutual benefit.


The two Governments agree to settle all disputes by peaceful means on the basis of the above-mentioned principles without resorting to the use or threat of force.


The two Governments agree that all foreign aggression and subversion and all attempts by any country to control any other country or to interfere in its internal affairs are to be condemned. They are opposed to any attempt by any country or group of countries to establish hegemony or create spheres of influence in any part of the world.


The two Governments agree to cooperate with each other to achieve the foregoing objectives.


The Philippine Government recognizes the Government of the People's Republic of China as the sole legal government of China, fully understands and respects the position of the Chinese Government that there is but one China and that Taiwan is an integral part of Chinese territory, and decides to remove all its official representations from Taiwan within one month from the date of signature of this communique.


The Government of the People's Republic of China recognizes the Government of the Republic of the Philippines and agrees to respect the independence and sovereignty of the Republic of the Philippines.


The two Governments recognize and agree to respect each other's territorial integrity.


The Government of the People's Republic of China and the Government of the Republic of the Philippines consider any citizen of either country who acquires citizenship in the other country as automatically forfeiting his original citizenship.


The two Governments agree to adopt active measures for the development of trade and economic relations between them. They have agreed to negotiate and conclude a trade agreement based on their respective needs and on the principles of equality and mutual benefit.


The two Governments noted the importance of cultural exchanges in developing mutual understanding and friendship between their two peoples.


The Government of the People's Republic of China and the Government of the Republic of the Philippines have agreed to exchange mutually accredited ambassadors as soon as practicable and to provide each other with all the necessary assistance for the establishment and performance of the functions of diplomatic missions in their respective capitals in accordance with international practice and on a reciprocal basis.



CHOU EN-LAI Premier of the State Council of the People's Republic of China

FERDINAND E.MARCOS President of the Republic of the philippines


Peking, June 9, 1975


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