Dixie's Land

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Dixie's Land
Daniel Decatur Emmett (disputed)
This song has dozens of variants. Here are a few notable versions.

I wish I was in de land ob cotton Daniel Decatur Emmett


I wish I was in Dixie's Land[edit]

The first authorized edition, published in New York in 1860 as "I wish I was in Dixie's Land", was most the popular version.
I wish I was in de land ob cotton,
Old times dar am not forgotten;
Look away! Look away! Look away! Dixie Land.
In Dixie Land whar I was born in,
Early on one frosty mornin,
Look away! Look away! Look away! Dixie Land.
(Chorus)
Den I wish I was in Dixie, Hooray! Hooray!
In Dixie Land, I'll took my stand,
To lib an die in Dixie,
Away, Away, Away down south in Dixie,
Away, Away, Away down south in Dixie.
Old Missus marry "Will-de-weaber,"
Willium was a gay deceaber;
Look away! Look away! Look away! Dixie Land.
But when he put his arm around'er,
He smilled as fierce as a forty-pound'er,
Look away! Look away! Look away! Dixie Land.
(Chorus)
His face was sharp as a butchers cleaber,
But dat did not seem to greab'er;
Look away! Look away! Look away! Dixie Land.
Old Missus acted de foolish part,
And died for a man dat broke her heart.
Look away! Look away! Look away! Dixie Land.
(Chorus)
Now here's a health to the next old Missus,
And all de galls dat want to kiss us;
Look away! Look away! Look away! Dixie Land.
But if you want to drive 'way sorrow,
Come an hear dis song to-morrow.
Look away! Look away! Look away! Dixie Land.
(Chorus)
Dar's buck-wheat cakes an 'Ingen' batter,
Makes you fat or a little fatter;
Look away! Look away! Look away! Dixie Land.
Den hoe it down an scratch your grabble,
To Dixie land I'm bound to trabble.
Look away! Look away! Look away! Dixie Land.

Early manuscript[edit]

This transcription is from a manuscript written in 1859.
I wish I was in de land ob cotton,
Cinnamon seed an sandy bottom,
Look away look away, Dixie Land,
In Dixie land whar I was born in,
Early on one frosty mornin,
Look away look away, away Dixie Land,
(Chorus)
Den I wish I was in Dixie, Horray, Hooray,
In Dixie's land, we'll took our stand, To lib an die in Dixie,
Away, away, away down south in Dixie,
Away, away, away down south in Dixie.
Old missus marry Will de Weaber,
William was a gay deceaber;
Look away look away, away Dixie Land.
When he put his arm around'er,
He look as fierce as a forty pound'er.
Look away look away, away Dixie Land.
(Chorus)
His face was sharp like a butchers cleaber,
But dat did not seem to greab'er;
Look away look away, away Dixie Land.
Will run away missus took a decline, O'
Her face was de color ob bacon rhine, O'
Look away look away, away Dixie Land.
(Chorus)
While missus libbed she libbed in clover,
When she died she died all ober;
Look away look away, away Dixie Land.
How could she act such a foolish part, O'
An marry a man to break her heart, O'
Look away look away, away Dixie Land...
(Chorus)
Buck-wheat cakes an stony batter,
Makes you fat or a little fatter;
Look away look away, away Dixie Land.
Here's a health to de next old missus,
An all de galls dat wants to kiss us.
Look away look away, away Dixie Land.
(Chorus)
Now if you want to drive 'way sorrow;
Come an hear dis song to-morrow;
Look away look away, away Dixie Land.
Den hoe it down an scratch y'er grabble,
To Dixie's land I'm bound to trabble
Look away look away, away Dixie Land.

Confederate lyrics[edit]

The next version of Dixie, called "The War Song of Dixie" or "Dixie War Song", was written by Henry Throop Stanton and published in 1861. It was a popular morale boosters for the Confederate army
Hear ye not the sounds of battle,
Sabres' clash and muskets' rattle?
To Arms! to Arms, to Arms in Dixie!
Hostile footsteps on our border,
Hostile columns tread in order;
To Arms! to Arms, to Arms in Dixie!
(Chorus)
Oh, fly to arms in Dixie!
To Arms! to Arms!
From Dixie's land we'll rout the land,
That comes to conquer Dixie,
To Arms! To Arms!
and rout the foe from Dixie!
To Arms! To Arms!
and rout the foe from Dixie!
See the red smoke hanging o'er us!
Hear the cannon's booming chorus!
To Arms! to Arms, to Arms in Dixie!
See our steady columns forming,
Hear the shouting! hear the storming!
To Arms! to Arms, to Arms in Dixie!
Gird you loins with sword and sabre,
Give your lives to Freedom's labor!
To Arms! to Arms, to Arms in Dixie!
What though every hearth be saddened?
What though all the land be reddened?
To Arms! to Arms, to Arms in Dixie!
Shall this boasting, mad invader
Trample Dixie and degrade her?
To Arms! to Arms, to Arms in Dixie!
By our fathers proud example!
Southern soil they shall not trample!
To Arms! to Arms, to Arms in Dixie!
Southrons, meet them on the border!
Charge them into wild disorder!
To Arms! to Arms, to Arms in Dixie!
Hew the Vandals down before you!
Till the last inch they restore you!
To Arms! to Arms, to Arms in Dixie!
Through the echoing hills resounding,
Hear the Southern bugles sounding!
To Arms! to Arms, to Arms in Dixie!
Arouse from every hill and valley,
List the bugle! Rally! rally!
To Arms! to Arms, to Arms in Dixie!
The next confederate version of Dixie, called "Everybody's Dixie", was written by General Albert Pike. It was the most popular Civil War version of Dixie
Southrons, hear your country call you,
Up, lest worse than death befall you!
To arms! To arms! To arms, in Dixie!
Lo! all the beacon-fires are lighted,
Let all hearts be now united!
To arms! To arms! To arms, in Dixie!
(Chorus)
Advance the flag of Dixie!
Hurrah! Hurrah!
In Dixie's land we take our stand,
And live or die for Dixie!
To arms! To arms!
And conquer peace for Dixie!
To arms! To arms!
And conquer peace for Dixie!
Hear the Northern thunders mutter!
Northern flags in South winds flutter!
To arms! To arms! To arms, in Dixie!
Send them back your fierce defiance!
Stamp upon the cursed alliance!
To arms! To arms! To arms, in Dixie!
Fear no danger! Shun no labor!
Lift up rifle, pike, and sabre!
To arms! To arms! To arms, in Dixie!
Shoulder pressing close to shoulder,
Let the odds make each heart bolder!
To arms! To arms! To arms, in Dixie!
How the South's great heart rejoices
At your cannon's ringing voices!
To arms! To arms! To arms, in Dixie!
For faith betrayed and pledges broken,
Wrongs inflicted, insults spoken,
To arms! To arms! To arms, in Dixie!
Strong as lions, swift as eagles,
Back to their kennels hunt these beagles!
To arms! To arms! To arms, in Dixie!
Cut the unequal bonds asunder!
Let them hence each other plunder!
To arms! To arms! To arms, in Dixie!
Swear upon your country's altar
Never to submit or falter
To arms! To arms! To arms, in Dixie!
Till the spoilers are defeated,
Till the Lord's work is completed!
To arms! To arms! To arms, in Dixie!
Halt not till our Federation
Secures among earth's powers its station!
To arms! To arms! To arms, in Dixie!
Then at peace and crowned with glory,
Hear your children tell the story!
To arms! To arms! To arms, in Dixie!
If the loved ones weep in sadness,
Victory soon shall bring them gladness
To arms! To arms! To arms, in Dixie!
Exultant pride soon vanish sorrow;
Smiles chase tears away to-morrow!
To arms! To arms! To arms, in Dixie!

Union lyrics[edit]

The Union's version, "Union Dixie" was a mockery of the South
Away down South in the land of traitors,
Rattlesnakes and alligators,
Right away, come away, right away, come away.
Where cotton's king and men are chattels,
Union boys will win the battles,
Right away, come away, right away, come away.
(Chorus)
Then we'll all go down to Dixie,
Away, away,
Each Dixie boy must understand
That he must mind his Uncle Sam,
Away, away,
And we'll all go down to Dixie.
Away, away,
And we'll all go down to Dixie.
I wish I was in Baltimore,
I'd make Secession traitors roar,
Right away, come away, right away, come away.
We'll put the traitors all to rout.
I'll bet my boots we'll whip them out,
Right away, come away, right away, come away.
(Chorus)
Oh, may our Stars and Stripes still wave
Forever o'er the free and brave,
Right away, come away, right away, come away.
And let our motto ever be --
For Union and for Liberty!"
Right away, come away, right away, come away.
(Chorus)

References[edit]

  • Nathan, Hans (1962). Dan Emmett and the Rise of Early Negro Minstrelsy. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press.