Federal Base Ball Club of Baltimore v. National League of Professional Base Ball Clubs

From Wikisource
Jump to: navigation, search


Federal Base Ball Club of Baltimore v. National League of Professional Base Ball Clubs by Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr.
Syllabus
Federal Baseball Club v. National League, 259 U.S. 200 (1922), is a case in which the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that the Sherman Antitrust Act did not apply to Major League Baseball. — Excerpted from Federal Baseball Club v. National League on Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
Court Documents
Opinion of the Court

United States Supreme Court

259 U.S. 200

FEDERAL BASE BALL CLUB OF BALTIMORE  v.  NATIONAL LEAGUE OF PROFESSIONAL BASE BALL CLUBS

 Argued: April 19, 1922. --- Decided: May 29, 1922

Messrs. Charles A. Douglas, of Washington, D. C., Wm. L. Marbury, of Baltimore, Md., and William L. Rawls, Hugh H. Obear, Jo. V. Morgan, and Charles S. Douglas, all of Washington, D. C., and L. Edwin Goldman, of Baltimore, Md., for plaintiff in error.

[Argument of Counsel from pages 201-205 intentionally omitted]

Messrs. George Wharton Pepper, of Philadelphia, Pa., and Benjamin S. Minor, of Washington, D. C., for defendants in error.

Mr. Justice HOLMES delivered the opinion of the Court.

Notes[edit]

This work is in the public domain in the United States because it is a work of the United States federal government (see 17 U.S.C. 105).