Health and beauty by Caplin

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Health & Beauty; or corset and clothing, constructed in accordance with the physiological laws of The human body.  (1856) 
by Roxey Ann Caplin
from 1856
CONTENTS: Chapters 0. I. II. III. IV. V. VI. VII. VIII. IX. X. - Images on Commons - Pages for edit

CONTENTS.


INTRODUCTION.

On the condemnation of Corsets by Medical Writers.—Dr. Copeland’s opinions controverted, and the true principles of the adaptation of clothing to the body defined, page vii-xii.

CHAPTER I.
ON THE RELATION or DRESS TO THE HUMAN FIGURE.

The absurdities of Fashion and the manner in which they are spoken of by ancient Authors.—On mutilating the body.—Chinese, Indians, &c.—Tight-lacing.—Dress in the fifteenth century.—Of Beauty.—The three different kinds, Minerva, Venus, Diana.—Of the erect position and stooping.—Difference between the male and female figure.—Of Dress in general, page 1-6.

CHAPTER II.
OF INFANCY, AND THE DRESSES ADAPTED TO THAT PERIOD OF LIFE.

Of birth, and the bandages which should be provided.—Pins, &c.—Evils resulting from carrying the child constantly upon one arm.—Clothing adapted to a new-born child.—Position in which infants should sleep.—Of the umbilical band, page 7-11.

CHAPTER III.
CLOTHING FROM THE AGE OF ONE TO TWELVE YEARS.

Baby is "short-coated."—Nursemaids dragging their charge across the streets.—"A step–father."—Education, schooling and playing.—Schools.—Weight of the clothes, how it should be supported.—Loose dressing, evils resulting from it.—Right-footed children.—Cure of a little boy, page 12-18.

CHAPTER IV.
CLOTHING FROM THE AGE OF TWELVE TO EIGHTEEN YEARS.

Of dress and exercise.—Processes necessary to life.—Motion.—The chest.—Breathing.—The skin.—Physical training of the child.—Bad habits.—Injurious fashions.—The East and West in matters of clothing.—The utility of the gymnastic Pilaster.—Boys’ clothing, page 19-34.

CHAPTER V.
THE CORSET, ITS HISTORY, USE, AND ABUSE.

Its general condemnation by the medical faculty.—They do not understand its use. —History of the Corset.—Laws regulating Dress.—True object of the Corset.—­Nature of its construction.—The "Hygienic corporiform Corset," page 35-41.

CHAPTER VI.
ON THE ADAPTATION OF THE CORSET TO THE BODY.

Construction of Corset.—Report of the "Athenée des Arts et Sciences de Paris."—Report of the Great Exhibition of 1851.—List of inventions and adaptations.—­Claims of originality.—Explanations of plates.—"Petticoat-suspender," page 42-51.

CHAPTER VII.
ON GESTATION.

On the phenomena of Gestation and the support necessary at that time.—"Gestation Corset."—Parturition.—The contracting belt, &c., page 52-60.

CHAPTER VIII.
MIDDLE AGE, AND ITS REQUIREMENTS.

Middle life defined.—Changes which take place in the body at that time.—Hottentot women and their pendulous mammæ.—Irish women.—Deformities of the breasts.—­African and European women compared.—French and German Corsets.—How Corsets should be constructed.—Constitutions of women stronger than that of men.—How a corpulent lady should be dressed, page 61-67.

CHAPTER IX.
ON SPINAL DEFORMITIES.

Importance of healthy exercises to children.—The erect position.—Structure of the spine.—Laurence's ideas.—Respiration.—Gentlemen's braces.—Dr. Caplin's "Lec­tures on Spinal Deformities" quoted.—The invisible crutch.—Scapula-contractor.—Monitor bodice, &c. &c., page 68-79.

CHAPTER X.
OLD AGE, WHAT CAN BE DONE TO SUSTAIN IT.

Painful feelings associated with the idea of old age.—Walker on the third age of woman.—Physiological changes.—"Premature old age."—What we can do to aid; nature, page 80-83.