Jones v. City of Opelika (316 U.S. 584)

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Jones v. City of Opelika (316 U.S. 584) by Stanley Forman Reed
Syllabus
Jones v. City of Opelika, 316 U.S. 584 (1942), was a case in which the Supreme Court of the United States held that a statute prohibiting the sale of books without a license was constitutional because it only covered individuals engaged in a commercial activity rather than a religious ritual. — Excerpted from Jones v. City of Opelika (1942) on Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
Court Documents
Opinion of the Court
Dissenting Opinions
Murphy
Stone

United States Supreme Court

316 U.S. 584

JONES  v.  CITY OF OPELIKA (316 U.S. 584)

 Argued: Feb. 5, April 30, 1942. --- Decided: June 8, 1942

In No. 280: Messrs. Hayden C. Covington and Joseph F. Rutherford, both of Brooklyn, N.Y., for petitioner Jones.

Mr. John W. Guider, of Washington, D.C., for respondent.

In No. 314:

Messrs. Osmond K. Fraenkel, of New York City, and Hayden Covington and Joseph F. Rutherford, both of Brooklyn, N.Y., for petitioners Bowden and another.

No. appearance for respondent.

In No. 966:

Mr. Hayden C. Covington, of Brooklyn, N.Y., for appellant Jobin.

No appearance for appellee.

Mr. Justice REED delivered the opinion of the Court.

Notes[edit]

This work is in the public domain in the United States because it is a work of the United States federal government (see 17 U.S.C. 105).