Manifesto of General Salis-Soglio to the Sonderbund army

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Manifesto of General Salis-Soglio to the Sonderbund army  (1847) 
by Johann Ulrich von Salis-Soglio, translated by M. J. Mayers
This manifesto was addressed by the commander of the Sonderbund forces, General Salis-Soglio, to his troops on the eve of the Sonderbund War, the 1847 civil war in Switzerland. The following translation of the original German text was published in the book by M. J. Mayers, Note-book of the late civil war in Switzerland (John W. Parker, London, 1848).

Soldiers, and faithful Confederates!

The highminded and free people of the seven-allied Catholic States have resolved to adhere firmly to their most sacred religion, and to all the laws and privileges inherited from a heroic ancestry. And to defend and protect these, with all your might and even your life, you arc now called to take up arms; whilst your pious wives and sisters lie prostrate in the house of God, to implore of the Lord of Hosts to give peace, or victory to your arms.

With greater joy and in greater numbers than on any former occasion, are you now crowding around those banners, which at Morgarten and Sempach and on other battle-fields, waved over the helmets of your brave fathers. That God who then fought for your fathers will now fight also for you.

Wherefore it has pleased the Most High to call me to a post so honorable and trust-worthy, I know not; but who can direct his most holy counsel? God's strength is oftentimes made perfect in the weakest human instrument! And if I am possessed of your confidence, mine is not less reposed in you. I know, that you will offer your prayers for me, even during the hottest moment of conflict. You will not forsake me any more than I will forsake you.

I am thankful to, and praise the Almighty, that I have been accounted worthy to be called to fight, and also to fall, with you, if it be His will, in a cause so good as our's. God be with us.

This work published before January 1, 1923 is in the public domain worldwide because the author died at least 100 years ago.