Marmion

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Marmion by Walter Scott
Contents
Scott, Walter. Marmion: A Tale of Flodden Field.


MARMION
A TALE OF FLODDEN FIELD
IN SIX CANTOS


Alas! that Scottish maid should sing
The combat where her lover fell!
That Scottish Bard should wake the string,
The triumph of our foes to tell!
LEYDEN.


TO
THE RIGHT HONOURABLE
HENRY, LORD MONTAGUE
&c. &c. &c.
THIS ROMANCE IS INSCRIBED
BY
THE AUTHOR

* * *

It is hardly to be expected, that an Author whom the Public have honoured with some degree of applause, should not be again a trespasser on their kindness. Yet the Author of MARMION must be supposed to feel some anxiety concerning its success, since he is sensible that he hazards, by this second intrusion, any reputation which his first Poem may have procured him. The present story turns upon the private adventures of a fictitious character; but is called a Tale of Flodden Field, because the hero’s fate is connected with that memorable defeat, and the causes which led to it. The design of the Author was, if possible, to apprize his readers, at the outset, of the date of his Story, and to prepare them for the manners of the Age in which it is laid. Any Historical Narrative, far more an attempt at Epic composition, exceeded his plan of a Romantic Tale; yet he may be permitted to hope, from the popularity of THE LAY OF THE LAST MINSTREL, that an attempt to paint the manners of the feudal times, upon a broader scale, and in the course of a more interesting story, will not be unacceptable to the Public.

The Poem opens about the commencement of August, and concludes with the defeat of Flodden, 9th September, 1513.
                                   Ashestiel, 1808.

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This work was published before January 1, 1923, and is in the public domain worldwide because the author died at least 100 years ago.