Nihon Shoki

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Nihon Shoki  (720) 

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The Nihon Shoki (日本書紀), sometimes translated as The Chronicles of Japan, is the second oldest book of classical Japanese history of Japan. It is more elaborate and detailed than the Kojiki, the oldest, and has proven to be an important tool for historians and archaeologists as it includes the most complete extant historical record of ancient Japan. The Nihon Shoki was finished in 720 under the editorial supervision of Prince Toneri and with the assistance of Ō no Yasumaro. The book is also called the Nihongi (日本紀, lit. Japanese Chronicles).

Scrolls[edit]

  • Scroll 1 - Age of the Gods (1)
  • Scroll 2 - Age of the gods (2)
  • Scroll 3 - Emperor Jimmu
  • Scroll 4 - Eight Absent Generations
  • Scroll 5 - Emperor Sujin
  • Scroll 6 - Emperor Suinin
  • Scroll 7 - Emperors Keiko and Seimu
  • Scroll 8 - Emperor Chuai
  • Scroll 9 - Empress Jingu
  • Scroll 10 - Emperor Ojin
  • Scroll 11 - Emperor Nintoku
  • Scroll 12 - Emperors Richu and Hanzei
  • Scroll 13 - Emperors Ingyo and Anko
  • Scroll 14 - Emperor Yuryaku
  • Scroll 15 - Emperors Seinei, Kenzo, and Ninken
  • Scroll 16 - Emperor Buretsu
  • Scroll 17 - Emperor Keitai
  • Scroll 18 - Emperors Ankan and Senka
  • Scroll 19 - Emperor Kimmei
  • Scroll 20 - Emperor Bidatsu
  • Scroll 21 - Emperors Yomei and Sujun
  • Scroll 22 - Empress Suiko
  • Scroll 23 - Emperor Jomei
  • Scroll 24 - Empress Kogyoku
  • Scroll 25 - Emperor Kotoku
  • Scroll 26 - Empress Saimei
  • Scroll 27 - Emperor Tenji
  • Scroll 28 - Emperor Temmu (1)
  • Scroll 29 - Emperor Temmu (2)
  • Scroll 30 - Empress Jito