Page:1880. A Tramp Abroad.djvu/159

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147
GARNHAM'S TRANSLATION.

I have a translation by Garnham, Bachelor of Arts, in the "Legends of the Rhine," but it would not answer the purpose I mentioned above, because the measure is too nobly irregular; it don't fit the tune snugly enough; in places it hangs over at the ends too far, and in other places one runs out of words before he gets to the end of a bar. Still, Garnham's translation has high merits, and I am not dreaming of leaving it out of my book. I believe this poet is wholly unknown in America and England; I take peculiar pleasure in bringing him forward because I consider that I discovered him:

THE LORELEI.

Translated by L. W. Garnham, B. A.

I do not known what it signifies.
 That I am so sorrowful?
A fable of old Times so terrifies,
 Leaves my heart so thoughtful.

The air is cool and it darkens,
 And calmly flows the Rhine;
The summit of the mountain hearkens
 In evening sunshine line.

The most beautiful Maiden entrances
 Above wonderfully there,
Her beautiful golden attire glances,
 She combs her golden hair.

With golden comb so lustrous,
 And thereby a song sings,
It has a tone so wondrous,
 That powerful melody rings.

The shipper in the little ship
 It effects with woes sad might;
He does not see the rocky clip,
 He only regards dreaded height.

I believe the turbulent waves
 Swallow at last shipper and boat;
She with her singing craves
 All to visit her magic moat.

No translation could be closer. He has got in all the facts;