Page:A Dictionary of Music and Musicians vol 4.djvu/827

From Wikisource
Jump to: navigation, search
This page needs to be proofread.


VERDELOT.

motets by Verdelot. (See also Van der Straeten, 'Musique de Pays-Bas,' vi. 473.) [J.R.M.]

VERI>L Line 3 of article, for Oct. 9 read Oct. 10. P. 240 &, omit note I, as there is no- thing in the mention of ' leather ' and ' pedals ' which militates against the instrument having been a spinet, as stated in the text. P. 247 b, 1. 26 from bottom,/or Roger read Royer. P. 248 a, 1. 27 from bottom, for March 17 read March 14. P. 248 b, 1. 26, for Oct. 26 read Oct. 25. P. 2500, L 39> f or April 12 read March 24 ; 1. 3 from bottom, for II read Un. P. 2506, 1. 18, for Dec. 27 read Dec. 24 ; 1. 31, for in read May 24. P. 251, add that Verdi's latest work,

  • Otello,' set to a poem founded on Shakespeare

by Boito, was produced at the Scala, under Faccio's direction, on Feb. 5, 1887. P. 2526, 1. 2, for Mini read Nini ; 1. 3, for Bouchenon read Boucheron ; 1. 8, for Mabollini read Mabel lini. P. 254 b, in list of works, for date of

Macbeth ' read March 14. For ' Stifellio ' in line i of second column and in note 3 read ' Stif- felio.' For date of ' Un ballo in Maschera ' read 1859.

VERDONCK, CORNELIUS, born at Turnhout in Belgium in 1563, belongs to the later school of Flemish composers, influenced from Italy, as Italy had earlier been influenced from Flanders. He lived chiefly at Antwerp, in the service of private patrons, and died there Jnly 4, 1625. As a musician, he must have been highly ap- preciated by his contemporaries, as the following epitaph, inscribed to his memory in the Car- melite Church at Antwerp shows ; a copy of which we owe to the obliging kindness of M. Goovaerts, keeper of the Public Archives at Brussels :

D. O. M. S.

SISTE GRADUM VIATOR tTT PHRLEGAS QUAM OB REM HIC LAPIS LITTERATUS SIET

MUSICORUM DELICIAE

CORNELIUS VERDONCKIUS

TURNHOLTANUS HOC CIPPO EHEU I CLAUSUS

PERPETUUM SILET

QUI DUM VIXIT

VOCE ET ARTE MUSICA

MORTEM SURDA NI ESSET FLEXISSBT

QUAM DUM FRUSTRA DEMULCET COELI CHORIS VOCEM AETERNAM SACRATURUS

ABIT

IV NON. JUL. ANNO MDCXXV AETAT. LXII

AT TU LECTOR BENE PRECARE ET VALB

CLIENTI SUO MOESTUS PONEBAT

DE CORDES.

His compositions consist chiefly of madrigals for four, six, and up to nine voices, many of which appear in the miscellaneous collections published at Antwerp by Hubert Waelrant and Peter Phalese between 1585 and 1610. For details, see Goovaerts' ' Histoire et Bibliographic de la Typographic Musicale dans les Pays-Bas ' ; also Eitner's ' Bibliographic der Sammelwerke.' One of his madrigals was received into Young's English collection entitled * Musica Transal- pina,' published in London, 1588. A few sacred compositions also appear among the published works of Verdonck. An Ave Maria of his for 4 voices is printed in the Ratisbon ' Musica Di- vina,' Annus, ii. Liber ii, 1874. [J.R.M.]

��VESQUE VON PUTTLINGEN. 811

< VEREENIGING, etc. The list of publica- tions issued by this society is to be continued as follows :

��11. Const. Huygens, Pathodia 14. J

Sacra et Profana' (ed. W. J. A. Jonckbloet and J. P. N. Land, 1883).

12. Six Psalms by Sweelinck. In

4 parts (ed. B. Eitner, 1884). 18. J. A. Beinken's 'Hortus Musi- cus ' (ed. J. 0. M. Tan Biems- dijk. 1886).

��. A. Beinken, 'Partite divers*

sopra 1'Aria : ' Schweiget mir

von Weiber nehmen' (1887). (Without. No.) J. P. Sweelinck,

Sacrum Convivium,' 5-

part motet. 15. 3. P. Sweelinck, Cantio sacra,

' Hodie Christus natus eat."

6 parts.

��The second volume of the society's 'Tijd- schrifV was completed in 1887.

VERTICAL (or PERPENDICULAR) AND HORIZONTAL METHODS OF COMPOSI- TION. Two highly characteristic and expressive terms, used by modern critics for the purpose of distinguishing the method of writing culti- vated by modern Composers from that practised by the older Polyphonists.

The modern Composer constructs his passages, for the most part, upon a succession of Funda- mental or Inverted Chords, each of which is built perpendicularly upwards, from the bass note which forms its harmonic support, as in the example on p. 520 of the present Ap- pendix.

The Polyphonic Composer, on the other hand, thinking but little of the Harmonies upon which his passages are based, forms them by weaving together, horizontally, two or more Melodies, arranged in contrapuntal form that is to say, in obedience to a code of laws which simply provides for the simultaneous progression of the Parts, with the certainty that, if they are artistically woven together, the resulting Harmony cannot fail to be pure and correct ; as in the example on pp. 580 and 581 of this Appendix. [W.S.R.]

VESQUE VON PUTTLINGEN, JOHANN, born of a noble family of Belgian origin, July 23, 1803, at Opole, the residence of Prince Alexander Lubomirski. His parents went to live in Vienna in 1804, and at 12 years old he was sent to the Lowenbiirgische Convict there for about a year. He began his musical studies in 1816, learning successively from Leidesdorf, Moscheles, and Worzischek. In 1822 he went to the Uni- versity of Vienna in order to study for the civil service, which he entered in 1827. As early as 1830 he completed an opera, on the libretto of Rossini's ' Donna del Lago/ which was per- formed by amateurs in a private house. In 1833 he studied counterpoint, etc., with Sechter, and in Oct. 1838 a 2-act opera, 'Turandot,' was given with success at the Karnthnerthor Theatre. In this and his other musical compositions he adopted the pseudonym of * J. Hoven.' Two years later a third opera, * Jeanne d'Arc/ in

3 acts, was given in Vienna. The work was considered worthy of being performed at Dresden in 1845, with Johanna Wagner in the principal part. His other operas are * Der Liebeszauber,'

4 acts, 1845; 'Ein Abenteuer Carl des II,' i act, 1850; 'Burg Thayer,' 3 acts, apparently not performed ; ' Der lustige Rath,' 2 acts, 1852, produced at Weimar by Liszt; 'Lips

�� �