Page:A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man (Huebsch 1916).djvu/106

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and he prayed that the day might come quickly. His prayer, addressed neither to God nor saint, began with a shiver, as the chilly morning breeze crept through the chink of the carriage door to his feet, and ended in a trail of foolish words which he made to fit the insistent rhythm of the train; and silently, at intervals of four seconds, the telegraph-poles held the galloping notes of the music between punctual bars. This furious music allayed his dread and, leaning against the window ledge, he let his eyelids close again.

They drove in a jingle across Cork while it was still early morning and Stephen finished his sleep in a bedroom of the Victoria Hotel. The bright warm sunlight was streaming through the window and he could hear the din of traffic. His father was standing before the dressingtable, examining his hair and face and moustache with great care, craning his neck across the water-jug and drawing it back sideways to see the better. While he did so he sang softly to himself with quaint accent and phrasing:

"'Tis youth and folly
Makes young men marry,
So here, my love, I'll
 No longer stay.
What can't be cured, sure,
Must be injured, sure,
 So I'll go to Amerikay.

"My love she's handsome,
My love she's bony:
She's like good whisky
 When it is new;

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