Page:A treasury of war poetry, British and American poems of the world war, 1914-1919.djvu/50

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ENGLAND


O with what gilding ray was the land agleam!
It was not sun and dew, bush, bough and leaf,
But human spirits visible as in a dream
That turns from glad to aching, being too brief:
Courage and beauty shining in such brightness
That the dark thoughtful woods were no more lightless.


But most the hills a splendour had put on
Of golden honour, bright and high and calm
And like old heroes young men dream upon
When midnight stirs with magic sword and palm;—
With the fled mist all meanness put away
And the air clear and keen as salt sea-spray . . .


And yet no dream, no dream! I saw the whole,
The reap'd fields, idle kine and wandering sheep.
A weak wind through the near tall hedge-tree stole,
And died where Dover's Hill rose bare and steep;
I saw yet what I saw an hour ago,
But knew what save by dreams I did not know—


Sweet England!—wild proud heart of things unspoken,
Spirit that men bear shyly and love purely;
That dies to live anew a life unbroken
As spring from every winter rising surely;
Sweet England unto generations sped,
Now bitter-sweetest for her daily dead.

    September, 1916.
 


ENGLAND YET

SHE'S England yet! The nations never knew her;
 Or, if they knew, were ready to forget.
She made new worlds that paid no homage to her,
 Because she called for none as for a debt.
The bullying power who deemed all nations craven,
 And that her star of destiny had set,
Was sure that she would seek a coward's haven—
 And tempted her, and found her England yet!

We learn our England, and we soon forget,
To learn again that she is England yet.