Page:Aboriginal welfare 1937.djvu/4

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CORPORAL PUNISHMENT.

That this Conference is not seized of the necessity for corporal punishment. (See p. 35.)

POLICE OFFICERS AS PROTECTORS.

That further discussion of this subject he postponed until the next conference. (See p. 32.)

FEMALE PROTECTORS.

While the use of female protectors or inspectors for supervision of female natives in populated areas may in places be desirable, the general appointment of women is not considered practicable, because of the very scattered nature of native camps, the difficulties of travel and the isolation. (See p. 33.)

CHAINING OF NATIVES.

That where, for the safety of the escort and the security of the prisoners, it is necessary to subject the prisoners to restraint, it is the opinion of the representatives from the States and Territory concerned that the use of the neck chain while travelling through bush country is preferable to the use of handcuffs, for humanitarian reasons and having regard to the comfort of the prisoners. (See p. 32.)

COURTS FOR NATIVE AFFAIRS.

That the jurisdiction of the Court for Native Affairs shall be confined to cases in which both parties are natives.

That mixed cases—those in which a native is involved against a white man or a man of other race—be dealt with by the ordinary courts of the State or Territory.

That a native he not allowed to plead guilty in any case, except with the approval of the Chief Protector.

That a native charged before a white man's court shall have adequate representation by counsel or a protector, or both.

That no confession before trial shall he sought or obtained, or, if obtained, it shall be disregarded by the Court. (See section 60 (1.) of the Native Administration Act, 1905-1936 of Western Australia.)

That for the purpose of this resolution a native shall be a native as defined by this Conference. (See p. 31.)

COMPELLABILITY OF WITNESSES.

That in the opinion of this Conference any native woman who, at the time of the commission of the alleged offence, was living as the consort of the defendant and who may reasonably be expected to continue in that association during and subsequent to the legal proceedings, should have the protection of law accorded to a legal wife. (See p. 30.)

INTOXICATING LIQUOR.

That uniform legislation be adopted to provide that the supply of intoxicating liquors (including methylated spirits) to natives, as defined in the new definition, shall be an offence. (See p. 28.)

OPIUM DROSS.

That this Conference is of the opinion that, in order to prevent the smoking of opium dross by aborigines, the Commonwealth should give consideration to a scheme to place all opium addicts in Northern Australia, of whatever nationality, under strict medical supervision, in order to control the supply of the drug, with a view to effecting the cure of the individual, the reduction of the number of addicts in the future, and especially for the purpose of preventing any trade in opium dross. (See p. 25.)

PENSIONS AND MATERNITY ALLOWANCES.

That all natives of less than full blood be eligible to receive invalid and old-age pensions and maternity allowance on the recommendation of the State authority, to whom the grant should be made in trust for the individual. (See p. 27.)

RETURN OF NATIVES TO HOME STATE.

That provision be made to give discretionary power to return to his home State any aboriginal temporarily resident in another State. (See p. 22.)

GOVERNMENT SUBSIDY TO MISSIONS.

That no subsidy be granted to any mission unless the mission body agrees to comply with any instruction of the authority controlling aboriginal affairs in respect of—

(a) the standard of education of natives on the mission;

(b) the measures to he taken for the treatment of sickness and the control of communicable diseases;

(c) the diet of natives fully maintained on the mission;

(d) the measures to he taken to regulate the hygienic housing of natives; and

(e) the maintenance of the mission in a sanitary condition,

and that the mission be subject to regular inspection by an officer of the authority. (See p. 29.)

CONTROL OF MISSION ACTIVITIES BY GOVERNMENT.

That governmental oversight of mission natives is desirable.

To that end suitable regulations should he imposed covering such matters as inspection, housing, hygiene, feeding, medical attention and hospitalization, and education and training of inmates, with which missions should be compelled to conform. (See p. 30.)

COMPOSITION OF FUTURE CONFERENCES.

That future conferences should consist of representatives of Protectors and Governmental Boards. (See p. 29.)

7. The members of the Conference are of opinion that the bringing together of the representatives of the various States and of the Commonwealth affords an excellent opportunity for a free interchange of ideas and discussion of aboriginal problems, and that it is desirable that similar conferences should continue to be held annually, particularly between the Commonwealth and those States where the stage of development of the natives is reasonably akin, and where there are common difficulties of administration to be solved. It would be of advantage if the place of meeting could be changed each year, so that representatives might come into close contact with the actual problems as they arise in each part of the Commonwealth.

8. The Department of the Interior, Canberra, has offered to establish a Secretariat for future conferences, and to provide liaison between the various States and the Northern Territory.

9. A report of the proceedings of the Conference is appended.

Signatures
H. S. BAILEY.
T. A. CARRODUS.
C. E. COOK.
E. SYDNEY MORRIS.
B. C. HARKNESS
A. C. PETTITT.
L. L. CHARMAN.
J. W. BLEAKLEY.
M. T. McLEAN.
J. B. CLELAND.
A. O. NEVILLE.