Page:Austen - Sense and Sensibility, vol. III, 1811.djvu/47

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( 39 )

been so plaguing me!—I declare sometimes I do not know which way to look before them.”

She had wandered away to a subject on which Elinor had nothing to say, and therefore soon judged it expedient to find her way back again to the first.

“Well, but Miss Dashwood,” speaking triumphantly, “people may say what they chuse about Mr. Ferrars’s declaring he would not have Lucy, for it’s no such thing I can tell you; and it is quite a shame for such ill-natured reports to be spread abroad. Whatever Lucy might think about it herself, you know, it was no business of other people to set it down for certain.”

“I never heard any thing of the kind hinted at before, I assure you,” said Elinor.

“Oh, did not you? But it was

said,