Page:Austen - Sense and Sensibility, vol. III, 1811.djvu/57

From Wikisource
Jump to: navigation, search
This page has been proofread, but needs to be validated.

( 49 )

riage with Lucy was as firmly determined on, and the time of its taking place remained as absolutely uncertain, as she had concluded it would be;—every thing depended, exactly after her expectation, on his getting that preferment, of which, at present, there seemed not the smallest chance.

As soon as they returned to the carriage, Mrs. Jennings was eager for information; but as Elinor wished to spread as little as possible intelligence that had in the first place been so unfairly obtained, she confined herself to the brief repetition of such simple particulars, as she felt assured that Lucy, for the sake of her own consequence, would chuse to have known. The continuance of their engagement, and the means that were able to be taken for promoting its end, was all her communication; and this produced

VOL. III.
from
D