Page:Austen Sanditon and other miscellanea.djvu/51

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27
SANDITON

I trust we shall), then we shall be able to call it Waterloo Crescent, and the name joined to the form of the Building, which always takes, will give us the command of Lodgers. In a good Season we should have more applications than we could attend to.’ ‘It was always a very comfortable House,’ said Mrs. Parker, looking at it through the back window with something like the fondness of regret. ‘And such a nice Garden—such an excellent Garden.’ ‘Yes, my Love, but that we may be said to carry with us. It supplies us, as before, with all the fruit and vegetables we want; and we have in fact all the comfort of an excellent Kitchen Garden, without the constant Eyesore of its formalities, or the yearly nuisance of its decaying vegetation. Who can endure a Cabbage Bed in October?’ ‘Oh! dear, yes. We are quite as well off for Gardenstuff as ever we were, for if it is forgot to be brought at any time, we can always buy what we want at Sanditon House. The Gardener there is glad enough to supply us.’ ‘But it was a nice place for the Children to run about in. So shady in Summer!’ ‘My dear, we shall have shade enough on the Hill and more than enough in the course of a very few years. The Growth of my Plantations is a general astonishment. In the meanwhile we have the Canvas Awning, which gives us the most complete comfort within doors, and you can get a Parasol at Whitby’s for little Mary at any time, or a large Bonnet at Jebb’s; and as for the Boys, I must say I would rather them run about in the Sunshine than not. I am sure we agree, my dear, in wishing our Boys to be as hardy as possible.’ ‘Yes, indeed, I am sure we do, and I will get Mary a little Parasol, which will make her as proud as can be. How grave she will walk about with it, and fancy herself quite a little Woman. Oh! I have not the smallest doubt of our being a great deal better off where we are now. If we any of us want to bathe, we have not a quarter of a mile