Page:Commentaries on Genesis (Calvin) Vol 1.djvu/26

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xvi
TRANSLATOR'S PREFACE.

the opportunity of judging for himself, a few verses of the first chapter of Genesis are transcribed from each.

THE VERSION OF LEO JUDA.   THE VERSION OF CALVIN.
 1. In principio creavit Deus cœlum et terram.  1. In principio creavit Deus cœlum et terram.
 2. Terra autem erat clesolata et inanis, tenebræque erant in superficie voraginis: et Spiritus Dei agitabat sese in superficie aquarum.  2. Terra autem crat informis et inanis, tenebræque erant in superficie voraginis: et Spiritus Del agitabat se in superficie aquarum.
 3. Dixitque Deus, Sit Lux, et fuit lux.  3. Et dixit Deus, Sit Lux, et fuit lux.
 4. Viditque Deus lucem quod esset bona, et divisit Deus lucem à tenebris.  4. Viditque Deus lucem quod bona esset, et divisit Deus lucem à tenebris.
 5. Vocavitque Deus lucem Diem, et tenebras vocavit Noctem ; fuitque vespera, et fuit mane dies unus.  5. Et vocavit Deus lucem Diem, et tenebras vocavit Noctem. Fuitque vespera, et fuit mane dies primus.
 6. Dixit quoque Deus, Sit expansio, &c.  6. Et dixit Deus, Sit extensio, &c.

A similar examination was next resorted to, for the purpose of ascertaining the source of Calvin's French Version. The first printed version of the Scriptures into French was from the pen of Jacques Le Fèvre d'Estaples; or, as he was more commonly called, Jacobus Faber Stapulensis. It was printed at Antwerp, by Martin L'Empereur. Though its Author was in communion with the Church of Rome, yet the version is "said to be the basis of all subsequent French Bibles, whether executed by Romanists or Protestants."[1]

The first Protestant French Bible was published by Robert Peter Olivetan, with the assistance of his relative, the illustrious John Calvin, who corrected the Antwerp edition wherever it differed from the Hebrew.[2] It might have been expected that Calvin would have placed this version—made under his own eye, and perfected by his own assistance—without alteration at the head of his Commentaries. But it

  1. Horne's Introduction, vol. v. p. 116.
  2. Ibid. p. 118