Page:English Caricaturists and Graphic Humourists of the nineteenth century.djvu/17

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CONTENTS.

early part of the Century.—Thackeray's Difficulty.—Caricatures on the "Dandies" of 1818.—Robert and his Fellow-Caricaturists ridicule the sham "Corinthians"—and "Corinthian Kates" of their day.—Hollow Pretensions of the "Dandies."—"The Dandy Dressing at Home" and "The Dandy Dressed."—"A Dandyess."—Robert's Satires on the "Dandies" of 1819.—"The Mysterious Fair One, or the Royal Introduction to the Circassian Beauty."—Other Caricatures of his of 1819.—His Satires on the Trial of Queen Caroline.—His Caricatures of 1821.—Duel between the Dukes of Bedford and Buckingham.—Other Satires by him in 1822.—Interference of Louis XVIII. in Spanish Affairs.—Robert's Satires on Louis and his Son.—"The Golden Ball."—Other Caricatures by Robert in 1823.—The Tenth Hussars.—Maria Foote and "Pea-green Hayne."—Other satires by Robert in 1824.—Colonel Fitz-Bastard and Mr. Judge.—Cox v. Kean.—Sir Walter Scott.—"The Living Skeleton."—Popple and Stockdale.—Other Subjects of 1825.—"Cruikshankiana."pp. 89-108.

Book Illustrations of Isaac Robert Cruikshank.—The "Life in London."—Injustice done to Robert with reference to this Book.—The "Life" Dramatized.—Excitement it Occasioned.—The Portly Stranger in the Duke's Box.—Queer Visitors at Rehearsal.—Horror of the Serious People.—The Mistake which they made.—"The Finish."—Pierce Egan's Position with reference to the "Life."—Origin of "Bell's Life in London."—Charles Molloy Westmacott.—"The English Spy."—"The Oppidans' Museum."—The "King at Home."—Rowlandson's contribution to "The English Spy."—Westmacott and the Literature of Foote and Hayne.—Robert's Carelessness.—"Points of Misery."—"Doings in London."—"Cruikshank's Comic Album."—"Monsieur Nong-tong-paw."—Three Books Illustrated by Robert.—Death.pp. 109-124.

Caricatures of George Cruikshank.—"No Plan, no Ambition."—The Assertion Disproved.—Why George's Caricatures possess so remarkable an Interest.—"The Scourge."—Lord Sidmouth's Bill to amend the Toleration Act.—Opposition to the Measure by the Nonconformists.—George's Satire upon them.—Satire upon the Medical Profession.—"The Satirist, or Monthly Meteor."—"Fashion."—"The Loyalists' Magazine."—An Early Satire.—"Meditations amongst the Tombs."—Other Satires of 1813.—"Little Boney gone to Pot."—Alexander of Russia and the Duchess of Oldenburg.—The Princess Caroline.—Joanna Southcott.—The Obnoxious Corn Laws of 1815.—Satires thereon.—Escape of Napoleon.—Outlawed by the Powers.—Excitement caused by this Event.—George's Satires thereon.—Napoleon endeavours to Establish Friendly Relations.—Silent Hostility of Europe.—He Sets out for the Army.—George's Satire thereon.—Surrender of Bonaparte.—The Bellerophon off the English Coast.—Other Satires of 1815.—The Regent's Repugnance to Retrenchment and Reform.—Marriage of the Princess Charlotte.—Satire on the Purchase of the