Page:Equitation.djvu/72

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body always perpendicular to the ground, his loins supple to neutralize the shock.

No other part of horsemanship has given rise to more theories than has jumping. For no two horses jump just alike, nor do any two men ride in precisely the same way. When, therefore, we consider

THE HORSE JUMPS THE OBSTACLE MOUNTED AND UNDER THE CONTROL OF THE RIDER


the different speeds, strides, and conformations of horses, with their differing energy, the special qualities of experience, seat, conformation, and tact of hand of riders, and the various conditions of ground, the excitement occasioned by the company, the variety in height, width, and stiffness of the obstacle to be passed, to say nothing of the tempo-