Page:Flora Australiensis Volume 5.djvu/579

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Dryandra.]
567
CIV. PROTEACEÆ.

cuneate, undulate and deeply prickly-toothed or almost entire, tapering at the case, 1½ to 2½ or rarely 3 in. long, penniveined and reticulate but not white underneath. Flower-heads terminal, closely surrounded by flower leaves longer than the flowers. Involucre broad, about ½ in. long, silky-tomentose, the outer bracts lanceolate and some of the almost leafy, the inner ones very narrow, passing into the filiform paleæ. Perianth about 1¼ in. long, hirsute with fine hairs, short on the tube rather longer on the limb, the limb narrow, acute, 2½ lines long. Style nearly 1½ in. long, the stigmatic end slender, obscurely furrowed. Capsule broadly rounded, about ½ in. diameter.—Meissn. in Pl. Preiss. i. 590, and in DC. Prod. xiv. 468.

W. Australia. King George's Sound or adjoining districts, R. Brown, Baxter, Drummond, n. 175, 3rd coll. n. 292, Maxwell.

4. D. falcata, R. Br. in Trans. Linn. Soc. x. 213, Prod. 397. A shrub of 4 or 5 ft., the young branches usually tomentose and hirsute with spreading hairs. Leaves more or less cuneate, pinnatifid or deeply toothed with lanceolate pungent-pointed teeth or lobes, tapering at the base but almost sessile, mostly 2 to 3 in. long, flat or undulate, very rigid and not white underneath. Flower-heads terminal, closely surrounded by flower leaves longer than the flowers. Involucres broadly ovoid or almost globular, 7 to 8 lines long, the outer bracts linear-lanceolate and tomentose, the inner ones narrow-linear. Perianth 1¼ to 1½ in. long, the tube woolly-tomentose above the glabrous base, the limb glabrous. Style scarcely exceeding the perianth, the stigmatic end slender and not very distinct. Capsule "1-seeded by abortion, the abortive ovule forming a wing-like appendage to the interseminal plate."—Hemiclidia baxteri, R. Br. Prot. Nov. 40; Meissn. in Pl. Preiss. i. 601, and in DC. Prod. xiv. 482; Bot. Reg. t. 1455.

W. Australia. King George's Sound or to the eastward, R. Brown, Baxter, Drummond, 4th coll. n. 321; near Cape Riche, Preiss, n. 527.

I have not succeeded in finding any capsules in any of our sets of Baxter's or of Drummond's specimens, but as far as I can understand the characters given, the difference in the fruit upon which the genus Hemiclidia was founded is merely the result of the abortion of one ovule, which occurs occasionally or perhaps constantly in one or two other species of Dryandra. The foliage and inflorescence of D. falcata are precisely those of D. armata, from which I am unable to distinguish flowering specimens except by the glabrous perianth-limb.

5. D. armata, R. Br. in Trans. Linn. Soc. x. 212, Prod. 397. A much-branched shrub of 2 to 4 ft., the young branches tomentose. Leaves 2 to 3 in. long, deeply pinnatifid with lanceolate or triangular pungent-pointed lobes, very rigid, flat or undulate, veined reticulate and sometimes slightly tomentose underneath. Flower-heads terminal, closely surrounded by floral leaves longer than the flowers. Involucre broadly ovoid or almost globular, about ¾ in. long; the bracts at first villous at length becoming glabrous, the outer ones broad, the inner narrow. Perianth above 1 in. long, more or less villous, the limb narrow, obtuse, becoming glabrous at the end but not entirely so as in that