Page:Historical account of Lisbon college.djvu/16

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HISTORICAL ACCOUNT OF LISBON COLLEGE.

William Ellis, alias Edward Waring, Warwickshire.
Humphrey Ellis, alias Stephen Waring, Warwickshire.
Peter Nelson, alias Metcalf, Yorkshire.
Edward Stanley, alias Biddlecorn, Dorsetshire.
William Talbot, alias Day, Suffolk.
Antony Morgan, alias Saunders, Northampton.
Richard Arundel, alias Charnock, Bedfordshire.

These were accompanied by the Rev. Mark Harrington who held the Degree of Bachelor of Divinity in the Sorbonne University, whose duty it would be to assist as vespertine lecturer in delivering the Theological lectures. The President had also solicited the services of a Dr. Mayler, an old and intimate friend, as Theology Professor. At this time Mayler was attached to the service of the Prince of Metz, and was with him at the siege of Rochelle but, on receiving this invitation, he immediately and generously complied with it, notwithstanding the labours and inconveniences with which it was attended. He arrived at the College on the Eve of Christmas Day, 1628, in spite of a quartan-ague which he had contracted in his journey through Spain.

Everything being thus in readiness, February 22, 1629, the Festival of the Chair of St. Peter at Antioch, was fixed upon for publicly opening the schools. Every heart exulted at the prospect of so auspicious an event. The hopes, however, of the new Community were on this occasion dashed by a severe and unexpected stroke. On that very day, after a fortnight s illness the President, Father Harvey, broken down by his exertions and labours, departed this life, verifying in his own case, as so often happens, our Lord s words: "It is one man that soweth and it is another that reapeth." He lies buried in the College church. He left about 800 crowns to be divided between the College and Dr. Mayler, the first Professor of Theology, who, however, as the Annals remark, was obliged by the narrow circumstances in which he found the establishment to surrender for its use his own share of the legacy. Dr. Mayler opened the schools on the Twenty-fifth of the following April, and