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HISTORICAL ACCOUNT OF LISBON COLLEGE.
  1. Catholics no Idolaters, or a full refutation of Stillingfleefs unjust charge of Idolatry against the Church of Rome. [London, 1671.]
  2. A Just Discharge to Dr. Stilling fleets Unjust Charge against the Church of Rome. [Paris, 1677.]
  3. A Treatise concerning the Oath of Supremacy.
  4. A Sermon on St. Peter, preached before Her Majesty the Queen Dowager, on June 29th, 1686.
  5. A relation of a Conference before His Majesty and the Earl of Rochester concerning the Real Presence and Transubstantiation.
  6. A Sermon on the Nativity of Our Lord, preached before the Queen Dowager, in her chapel, Somerset House, Christmas Day, 1686.

Contemporary with Dr. Godden, his friend before his conversion, and his companion in College, was Dr. John Sergeant, to whom the reader has been already introduced. This bright ornament and devoted son of Lisbon College was born about the commencement of 1623. At an early age he was placed in St. John's College, Cam bridge, where his superior talents soon drew upon him notice and applause. After five years application to Philosophy he took the degree of Bachelor of Arts, and was received into the family of the celebrated champion of Protestantism, Dr. Morton, Bishop of Durham, in quality of secretary.

In this position he had an opportunity of becoming acquainted with all the Controversies in which the Doctor was engaged, and his attention was thus drawn to the unjustifiable means of which his patron did not hesitate to avail himself in defence of his principles and doctrines. The unscrupulous use of spurious quotations and garbled texts of which he was a witness, could not fail to produce in a mind sincerely anxious for the truth, a serious misgiving as to the cause, in support of which they were employed. Sergeant, however, for some time dissembled his uneasiness. Among his companions at the table of the Bishop, was one Mat-