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HISTORICAL ACCOUNT OF LISBON COLLEGE.

nounced it with so perfect an accent, that they were equally astonished and ashamed.

The numerous improvements and pious foundations which the pastoral zeal of this eminent Prelate projected and executed during the ten years that he governed the See of Portalegre scarcely belong to this sketch. Suffice it to say, that while he exhausted his income in works of piety and charity, he ceased not to labour, by means of instructions, and exhortations, conferences and the publication of pious books, for the spiritual improve ment of his flock and he had at length the consolation of beholding a complete reformation in the conduct of the clergy and the laity of his Diocese. In 1682 by a beneplacitum of Pedro II. he was transferred to the the See of Yizeu, which church he governed during the last eleven years of his life. He continued to exercise the same episcopal zeal and vigilance which had marked his conduct when Bishop of Portalegre. In a letter to His Holiness Pope Innocent XI. he gave an account of the various regulations which he had made in his Dio cese, and of the manner in which he had employed his revenues, and concluded his address in these words, " In these and similar works I have spent and exhausted the whole income of my church, so that after twenty-two years of the episcopal charge, I am able truly to say (not in pride but in the humility of a grateful heart be it spoken) gold and silver I have not. Cætera dicant Paduani."[1]

  1. "Cætera dicant Paduani."
    This is quoted from a Responsary of St. Bernard in the Office of St. Antony of Padua which commences: "Si quaeris Miracula." The verse in which it is found is as follows:

     Pereunt pericula
     Cessat et necessitas
     Narrent hi qui sentiunt
     Dicant Paduani.
     Dangers vanish—ceases likewise need—
    Let those who have experienced such relate these facts
     Let the Paduans declare them.