Page:Poems and extracts - Wordsworth.djvu/126

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NOTES �61 Akenside's 'Inscriptions,' no. vii {Poems, Aldine ed., p. 272 ; Anderson, ix. 804), 'Tlie Wood Nymph.' �The opening lines seem to prefigure the poetry of Blake, and of Keats : see Legouis, The Early Life of Wordsworth, p. 459. �62 1. 18 releas'd �63 Sonnet Ixiv, apparently quoted from memory, as the closing couplet should run : �This thought is as a death, which cannot choose But weep to have that which it fears to lose. In Prelude V. 26, Vi,\ quotes ' might almost " weep to have" what he may lose.' Similarly Coleridge misquotes �' We cannot choose But weep to have what we so dread to lose,' in Letters, p. 701 (ed. E. H. Coleridge). �64 Shakespeare, Sonnet xxxi. �65 Shakespeare, Sonnet xxix. 1. 12 sings �In the Essay supplementary to the Preface (ed. 1815, ii. 353) Wordsworth bids us ' for the various merits of thought and language in Shakespeare's Sonnets, see Numbers 27, 29, 30, 32, 33, 54, 64, 66, 68, 73, 76, 86, 91, 92, 93, 97, 98, 105, 107, 108, 109, 111, 113, 114, 116, 117, 129, and many others.' �66 A. Marvell's Poems (Muses' Library ed., p. 96), 'On a Drop of Dew.' Translated by Marvell from his Latin poem

  • Ros.' 1. 6 Round in

�67 1. 15 unsecure 1. 16 omit should 1. 17 pity 1. 18 exhale 1. 29 world-excluding �1. 30 receiving in �68 1. 86 upwards �W. judiciously omits these four concluding lines : Such did the manna's sacred dew distil ; White and entire, though congealed and chill ; Congealed on earth ; but does, dissolving, run Into the glories of the almighty sun. Poems by Mrs. Anne Killegrew, 1686. See Dryden's fine Ode ' To the pious memory of the accomplished young lady, Mrs. Anne Killegrew, excellent in the two sister arts of Poesy and Painting,' 1685. �102 ��� �