Page:Poetry of the Magyars.djvu/39

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xiv
INTRODUCTION.

rundial form for the present of the infinite, Evö- ben vagyok, (Hung.,) Láen porriem, (Lap.,) I am eating.[1] The Esthonian and Hungarian pro- nouns have a strong resemblance.

Esthonian
Hungarian

mis
mi
what

ke
ki
who

kegi
kiki
whoever

minna
én
I

mere
mi
we

teie
ti
you.

And in their expressions of endearment there is much similarity of phrase, as Kulla Herra, (Est.,) Aranyos Uram, (Hung.,) My golden Sir!


The affinities with some of the remoter idioms, are very remarkable. The word atya, father, is (as is well known) one found in a variety of dif- ferent tongues, though I suspect its resemblance to the first lispings of a child is the secret of its extension. But blended with a possessive pronoun, the affinities are extraordinary.

Cheremissian
Hungarian
Laplandish

Cheremissian
Hungarian
Laplandish

Atjam
Atyam
Attjain
My father
Atjane
Atyánk
Mo attjeh
our father

atjat
atyad
attjatt
thy father
atjada
atyátok
to atjeh
your father

atjáse
attya
attjes
his father
atjast
attyok
attjehs
their father[2]

  1. But Gyarmath is full of extravagant fancies. Many of his affinities are as far removed as possible. Who but he would
    have seen a resemblance between Jubmel and Isten, Adde Stal- pai and Addfarkesnak?
  2. Those who would pursue these researches into Tartary,