Page:Popular Science Monthly Volume 16.djvu/628

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598
THE POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY.

In every case, too, the stone which covered the passageway adjoining the chamber and forming part of its wall was of great size. The variation in the length of the passageways is due to their partial destruction. The other dimensions are quite uniform, as will be seen by comparing the following measurements of nine chambers, taken at random:

 
Length
of Camber.
Breadth
of Chamber.
Height
of Chamber.
Length of
Passageway.
Breadth of
Passageway.
Height of
Passageway.
14·0 10·6 11·6 28 4·3 5·3
9·0 7·3 8·6 22 5·6 5·8
14·0 11·8 8·9 7 4·5 5·0
13·0 7·0 8·8 20 4·6 5·0
14·0 6·4 8·6 14 4·3 5·0
11·0 5·6 8·7 11 3·6 5·3
12·0 5·8 8·3 *[1] 4·1 5·0
12·4 8·2 12·0 * 4·4 6·0
13·8 7·9 10·2 * 5·0 6·3
 

The plans vary but little—a single chamber, with the right wall flush with the right wall of the passageway, as in Fig. 3; or else the passageway entering the chamber on a median line, leaving a jog on each side, as in Fig. 2. Mr. Ogawa informed me that he had seen one with a small supplementary chamber leading from the end of the larger chamber.

PSM V16 D628 Appearance of chamber from the passageway.jpg
Fig. 5.—Appearance of Chamber from Passageway.

The passageway was nearly a foot narrower at the top than at the base, and in some cases was slightly narrower at the entrance.

In one case only were there signs that the chamber had been used

  1. Passageway partially destroyed. Measurement in feet and inches.