Page:Popular Science Monthly Volume 59.djvu/211

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201
THE WILD BIRD AT ARM'S LENGTH.

good light, and firmly fastened to stakes driven into the ground. The change is one of space relations which may change with every passing breeze, and though it may be of little significance to the birds it is of

 

PSM V59 D211 Cedar bird preparing to feed young.png

Fig. 2. Cedar-bird Approaching Nest with Gullet stuffed with Cherries prepared to feed Young by Regurgitation.

 

the utmost importance to the observer, since the nest now is but four instead of forty or more feet from the ground, and the screen of foliage which hid it from view has been withdrawn.

For an observatory I have adopted a green tent which conceals the student with his camera. The tent is pitched beside the nest, and when in use is open only at one point, marked by a small square window in line with the photographic lens and the nest.

By taking such liberties with wild birds, one might suppose we should bring destruction upon their homes and all that they contain,