Page:Popular Science Monthly Volume 85.djvu/105

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THE PROGRESS OF SCIENCE

THE PROGRESS OF SCIENCE

THE WORK OF THE GENERAL EDUCATION BOARD

The General Education Board, the foundation endowed by Mr. John I). Rockefeller, at a recent meeting nude large appropriations for educational work. Following the gifts of $1,500,000 to the Johns Hopkins University and $750,000 to Washington University for their medical schools on condition that the professors of medicine and surgery shall devote their entire time to the work of the school and not engage in private practise, a gift of $500,000 has been made to the medical school of Yale University under similar conditions and the further stipulation that the school obtain control of the New Haven Hospital. Other conditional appropriations amounting to $700,000 were made to Stevens Institute of Technology, Elmira College, Hendrix College, Washington and Lee University, Wells College and Wofford College.

Increased appropriations were made to develop the work in secondary education which the board has been carrying on in the south for ten years. The board has maintained professors of secondary education in southern universities and inspectors of secondary schools who have devoted their time to the creation and development of high schools in their several spheres.

The sum of $36,500 was appropriated for the maintenance of rural school supervisors in each of the southern states. • These supervisors are concerned with the improvement of country schools and with the introduction into them of industrial training and domestic science. The annual subscription of $10,000 toward the current expenses of Hampton Institute was increased to $25,000, an annual subscription of $10,000 was made to Tuskegee Institute, and one of $15,000 to Spelman Seminary, Atlanta.

Farm demonstration work on an educational basis was originated by the General Education Board. The plan was conceived by the late Dr. Seaman A. Knapp. So far as the southern states are concerned, congress now assumes the work heretofore supported by the General Education Board, objection having been made to the payment of the officers of the Department of Agriculture by a private contribution. The board will, however, continue its cooperation with agricultural colleges in the work. For this purpoose, $20,000 was appropriated for farm demonstration in six counties in Maine and for boys' and girls' clubs in that state. A further appropriation of $10,000 was made for similar work in New Hampshire.

To improve education in the rural districts the board has resolved to offer to support in connection with state departments of education, rural school agents. An appropriation of $50,000 was made for the work in fifteen states. A general agent will be appointed to keep the several state movements in touch with one another. The board resolved to authorize a study of training for public health service and of the organization of public health service in England, Germany, Denmark and other foreign countries. When the facts have been ascertained a conference will be held and a concrete scheme formulated for schools of public health.

 

THE CINCINNATI NEW GENERAL HOSPITAL

Large as are the gifts for hospitals and medical schools from private philanthropy, they are likely to be surpassed by public provision for the