Page:Popular Science Monthly Volume 86.djvu/37

From Wikisource
Jump to: navigation, search
This page has been proofread, but needs to be validated.
33
THE CINCHONA BOTANICAL STATION

THE CINCHONA BOTANICAL STATION. II
By Professor DUNCAN S. JOHNSON,
THE JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY

The Native Vegetation of the Cinchona Region

The native flora of Cinchona Hill is a varied and interesting one. Being south of the mountains, and on a sharp ridge with perfect drainage, the soil often gets quite dry. Especially is this true of the small pockets of humus in the rock clefts occupied by the numerous rock xerophytes, and of that gathered on the limbs of trees or held among the clustered roots of epiphytic orchids. We find here, therefore, many species characteristic of these xerophytic habitats. There are century plants, leathery-leafed terns, aroids, bromeliads, orchids and Peperomias growing in the clefts of the rocks and on the branches of trees and shrubs. Climbing or creeping ferns, aroids, orchids, milkweeds and cacti run over the ledges and larger plants. On the branches of the juniper and Dodonaea, of the thick-leafed Vaccinium, and even of the nearly leafless Baccharis on the dry hillsides, many species of leafy or

 

PSM V86 D037 Cliff with xerophytic plants.jpg

Cliff with Xerophytic Plants. A century plant in its native home.