Page:Southern Historical Society Papers volume 19.djvu/172

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166 Southern Historical Society Papers.

GENERAL JOHNSTON SEIZES THE FLAG.

Here, without field-officers and under command of a captain, the Fourth Alabama maintained its ground and did its part in resisting the enemy. General Johnston at one time came to us there and led us forward on a charge against the enemy, bearing our flag in his own hand. That glorious old warrior never appeared more magnifi- cent than he did at that moment on his prancing horse and flaunting our colors in the face of the foe, who fell back before us.

SMITTEN WITH FIRE.

Soon after this, the leading design of the Federals all day being to turn the Confederate left, the heaviest fighting veered in that direction, and in consequence the enemy disappeared from the imme- diate front of our regiment, leaving us unengaged ; but the fearful crash after crash of the Federal musketry, as fresh troops poured in against the Confederate centre and left, can never be forgotten by those who heard it. Farther and farther round its awful thunders rolled as if nothing could stay it. Our brigade comrades of the Sixth North Carolina separated, from us in the manoeuvres of the day, had rushed in single handed and been smitten as with fire, and their gallant Colonel Fisher and many of his men were no more. Jackson and his glorious brigade were struggling like giants to with- stand the fierce onslaught.

THE WORDS OF BEE.

It was just at this moment our Brigadier-General Bee came gal- loping to the Fourth Alabama and said : *' My brigade is scattered over the field, and you are all of it now at hand. Men, can you make a charge of bayonets ? " Those poor, battered, and bloody-nosed Alabamians, inspired by the lion like bearing of that heroic officer, responded promptly, " Yes, General, we will go wherever you lead, and do whatever you say." Bee then said, pointing towards where Jackson and his men were so valiantly battling about a quarter of a mile to the west and left of us, " Yonder stands Jackson like a stone wall. Let us go to his assistance." Saying this, he dismounted, placed himself at the left of the Fourth Alabama, and led the regi- ment (what remained of them) to Jackson's position and joined them on to his right.