Page:Southern Historical Society Papers volume 25.djvu/215

From Wikisource
Jump to: navigation, search
This page needs to be proofread.


/////. 211

list filled up the next day at Malvern Hill." Dr. Harvey Black, who neral Jackson at the time, has often told me that the General was completely overcome by fatigue, and, having fallen asleep, it was impossible to arouse him, and that this was the cause of the delay at White Oak Swamp.

Such was the position of the Confederate army at 2 o'clock on

Monday, June 3oth.

FRAZIER'S FARM.

The Federal General McCall held a line near the Charles City cross-roads at Frazier's Farm, supported by Sumner and Heintzle- man. An artillery duel opened about 3 o'clock, and the second or third shell from the enemy's guns fell and burst in a little field, where sat General Lee, President Davis and General Longstreet, killing two or three horses and wounding several men. First, Kemper, then Jenkins, and after these, four other brigades of Longstreet' s division, charged through the thick woods and swamp, with a battle front of only three-fouths of a mile. McCall was soon thrown back on Sum- ner and Heintzleman. Battery after battery was taken and then lost. The woods were soon full of dead and dying men. A. P. Hill's division was then ordered in. Branch's, Field's and Pender's brigades were hotly engaged. Bayonets were crossed in those dark woods. In the language of General McCall: "Bayonet wounds were freely given and received. I saw skulls crushed by the heavy blows of the butt of the musket, and in short the desperate thrusts and parries of life and death encounter proved, indeed, that Greek had met Greek, when the Alabama boys fell upon the sons of Penn- sylvania." The battle raged with fury, and death held high carni- val. The 47th Virginia captured a battery and turned the guns on the enemy, and following up this success, captured Major-General McCall.

The enemy fought with great desperation and gallantry. Feath- erstone's brigade was driven back in disorder, and Samuel McGowan, with the 1 4th South Carolina, came to their rescue with unsurpassed gallantry. On the right, two of our brigades were being repulsed, when Archer, in his shirt sleeves, at the head of his brigade, went in with the Confederate yell. Night was throwing its mantle over this scene of death and carnage, when Gen. J. R. Anderson, with his Georgia brigade, was ordered in, and forming two regiments in line on each side of the road, received the enemy's fire at seventy paces, and then engaged them in mortal combat. The volume of fire as it rolled along the line was terrific; every foot of ground was contested;