Page:Southern Historical Society Papers volume 28.djvu/67

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'.v Ferry <///</ /'/>>/ M<in<. 61

the whole that we were leaving the Ferry, though our military ardor was not quite cooled down by our "short, but arduous" campaign. We saw a little service, at all events, having been ordered out twice, in the morning and at night (and the night march was pretty severe for us), and having stood guard several times; my post was at the old burnt Armory buildings. We also saw some fun in searching the houses of Harper's Ferry for secreted arms, a great many of which we found.

On the whole we were very much pleased with our expedition, and considered war fine fun in those days; how we have changed our opinions since!

On our return by Manassas Junction on Wednesday, April 24th (my birthday, by the way. and the day on which I attained my ma- jority), I received permission from our Captain to go on to Alexan- dria, in order to pay a visit to the Episcopal High School, where my relations, Mr. McGuire's family, resided. I created quite a sen- sation, with my blue flannel shirt, red collar and cuffs, black pants, white cross-belts, musket and accoutrements, and from the fact that I had been to Harper's Ferry. After remaining there two or three days, the last time I have had an opportunity of seeing the dear old place, on Saturday I returned to the University.

Sunday, September 2Oth, [1863].

I have neglected this narrative for nearly a fortnight, but as to- day is Sunday and I have nothing to do, there being no service near, I will endeavor to continue it now.

Soon after reaching the University, our company requested the Governor, through our Captain, Ned Hutter, to accept our services, but he and General Lee, then commanding the Virginia forces, re- fused, saying that it was "too much good material to put in one company." We were required to give up our Minie muskets, which we had gotten at Harper's Ferry; so, after continuing our drills a few times more, our company disbanded, and the different members scattered themselves throughout the State and the South, entering the service in different capacities. Some received appointments in the Virginia Provisional Army, which appointments were vacated by general order about September ist following. I applied for one of these, but before receiving it the Virginia forces were turned over to the Confederacy, and no more appointments were made; I con-