Page:The Chartist Movement.djvu/28

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xviii
THE CHARTIST MOVEMENT



CHAPTER XVII
The Decline of Chartism (1842-1853) 259-312
(1) The Plug Plot and its Consequences (1842-1843) 259-267
Meetings denouncing the rejection of the Petition—The general strike—The Plug Plot—Chartist Conference in Manchester—MacDouall's inflammatory manifesto—O'Connor's attack on MacDouall—Failure of the strike—The Government re-establishes order—Prosecutions and punishments—MacDouall driven into exile—Revival of the Complete Suffrage Movement—Second Birmingham Conference of December 1842—Harney's defence of the Chartist name—Lovett's resolution carried and break-up of the Conference—O'Connor's fresh triumph—Sentences on the rioters.
(2) O'Connor's Land Scheme and the Chartist Revival (1843-1847) 267-284
Sluggishness of Chartism in 1843—The Birmingham Convention (1843)—New organisation of the National Charter Association—The Executive to meet in London—Transference of the Northern Star from Leeds to London (1844—O'Connor's Land Scheme proposed—Its origin—O'Connor's Letters to Irish Landlords—Reception of the Scheme at Birmingham (1843) and Manchester (1844)—Further progress at the London Convention (1845)—Details of the Scheme—Revival of prosperity weakens Chartism—Opposition to the Land Scheme within the Chartist fold—Opposition of O'Brien and Cooper—The National Land Company—Difficulties of the undertaking—O'Connor's qualities and defects—O'Connorville opened—Ernest Jones becomes O'Connor's chief lieutenant—Chartists and the General Election of 1847—O'Connor returned for Nottingham—His work in Parliament.
(3) Chartism and the Revolution op 1848 284-294
The Revolution of 1848 in Western Europe—The Chartist affinities with the Continental rebels—Arthur O'Connor and his nephew Feargus—O'Connor in Belgium—His relations with the German democrats exiled in Brussels—Friedrich Engels and Karl Marx—London as a revolutionary centre—The Chartist revival stimulated by the fall of Louis Philippe—Chartist disturbances—March 6,