Page:The Coming Race, etc - 1888.djvu/76

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62 THE COMING' RACE.

appeared to enjoy greatly the representation of these dramas, which, for so sedate and majestic a race of females, surprised me, till I observed that all the performers were under the age of adolescence, and conjectured truly that the mothers and sisters came to please their children and brothers.

I have said that these dramas are of" great antiquity. No new plays, indeed n6 imaginative works sufficiently important to survive their immediate day, appear to have been composed for several generations. In fact, though there is no lack of new publications, and they have even what maybe called newspapers, these are chiefly devoted to mechanical science, reports of new inventions, announce- ments respecting various details of business in short, to practical matters. Sometimes a child writes -a little tale of adventure, or a young Gy vents her amorous hopes or fears in a poem ; but these effusions are of very little merit, and are seldom read except by children and maiden Gy-ei./The most interesting works of a purely literary character are those of explorations and travels into other regions of this nether world, which are generally written by young emigrants, and are read with great avidity by the relations and friends they have left behind.

I could not help expressing to Aph-Lin my surprise that a com- munity in which mechanical science had made so marvellous a progress, and in which intellectual civilization had exhibited itself in realizing those objects for the happiness of the people, which the political philosophers above ground had, after ages of struggle, pretty generally agreed to consider unattainable visions, should, nevertheless, be so wholly without a contemporaneous literature, despite the excellence to which culture had brought a language at

ice rich and simple, vigorous and musical.

My host replied "Do you not perceive that a literature such as you mean would be wholly incompatible with that perfection of social or political felicity at which you do us the honour to think we have arrived ? We have at last, after centuries of struggle, settled into a form of government with which we are content, and in which, as we allow no differences of rank, and no honours are paid to administrators distinguishing them from others, there is no stimulus given to individual ambition. No one would read works advocating theories that involved any political or social change, and therefore no one writes them. If now and then an An feels himself dissatis^ fied with our tranquil mode of life, he does not attack it ; he goes away. Thus all that part pf literature (and to judge by the ancient books in our public libraries, it was once a very large part) which relates to speculative theories on society is become utterly extinct.

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