Page:The Harvard Classics Vol. 51; Lectures.djvu/11

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CONTENTS
 
PAGE
History 7
I. General Introduction. By Robert Matteson Johnston, M. A. (Cantab.), Assistant Professor of Modern History in Harvard University. 7
II. Ancient History. By William Scott Ferguson, Ph. D., Professor of History in Harvard University. 23
III. The Renaissance. By Murray Anthony Potter, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Romance Languages in Harvard University. 30
IV. The French Revolution. By Robert Matteson Johnston, M. A. (Cantab.) 36
V. The Territorial Development of the United States. By Frederick Jackson Turner, Ph. D., LL. D., Litt. D., Professor of History in Harvard University. 41
Poetry 48
I. General Introduction. By Carleton Noyes, A. M., formerly Instructor in English in Harvard University. 48
II. Homer and the Epic. By Charles Burton Gulick, Ph. D., Professor of Greek in Harvard University, and (1911­­­­–1912) in the American School of Classical Studies at Athens. 66
III. Dante. By Charles Hall Grandgent, A. B., Professor of Romance Languages in Harvard University. 71
IV. The Poems of John Milton. By Ernest Bernbaum, Ph.D., Instructor in English in Harvard University. 76
V. The English Anthology. By Carleton Noyes, A. M. 81
Natural Science 87
I. General Introduction. By Lawrence Joseph Henderson, M. D., Assistant Professor of Biological Chemistry in Harvard University. 87
II. Astronomy. By Lawrence Joseph Henderson, M. D. 105
III. Physics and Chemistry. By Lawrence Joseph Henderson, M. D. 110
IV. The Biological Sciences. By Lawrence Joseph Henderson, M. D. 115
V. Kelvin on “Light” and “The Tides.” By William Morris Davis, M. E., Ph. D., Sc. D., Sturgis-Hooper Professor of Geology, Emeritus, in Harvard University, Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, Exchange Professor to the University of Berlin and to the Sorbonne. 120
Philosophy 125
I. General Introduction. By Ralph Barton Perry, Ph. D., Professor of Philosophy, Harvard University. 125
II. Socrates, Plato, and the Roman Stoics. By Charles Pomeroy Parker, B. A. (Oxon.), Professor of Greek and Latin, Harvard University. 143

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