Page:The Hundred Best Poems (lyrical) in the English language - second series.djvu/138

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 To glass herself in dewy eyes
That watch me from the glen below.

Ah, bear me with thee, smoothly borne,
 Dip forward under starry light,
And move me to my marriage-morn,
 And round again to happy night.



78.
 

COME not, when I am dead,
 To drop thy foolish tears upon my grave,
To trample round my fallen head,
 And vex the unhappy dust thou wouldst not save.
There let the wind sweep and the plover cry;
 But thou, go by.

Child, if it were thine error or thy crime
 I care no longer, being all unblest:
Wed whom thou wilt, but I am sick of Time,
 And I desire to rest.
Pass on, weak heart, and leave me where I lie:
 Go by, go by.



79.
The Poet's Song.


THE rain had fallen, the Poet arose,
 He pass'd by the town and out of the street,
A light wind blew from the gates of the sun,
 And waves of shadow went over the wheat,
And he sat him down in a lonely place,
 And chanted a melody loud and sweet,

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