Page:The Solar System - Six Lectures - Lowell.djvu/104

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86 The Solar System  

Inclinations of orbits to planet's equator with increase of distance of planet .A second point connected with the system is the relative inclinations of the orbits to the plane of the planet's equator. The inclinations to the distance from planet's equator of the rings and of the several satellites proceeding outward are as follows :


SATURNIAN SYSTEM.
Inclination of Orbit to
Ecliptic Planet's Equator
° ' " ° ' "
Planet's equator . . . 28 10 22
Rings . . . . . . . 28 10 10 0 0 12
Mimas . . . . . . 28 10 10 0 0 12
Enceladus . . . . . 28 10 10 0 0 12
Tethys . . . . . . 28 10 10 0 0 12
Dione . . . . . . . 28 10 10 0 0 12
Rhea . . . . . . . 28 10 10 0 0 12
Titan . . . . . . . 27 38 49 0 31 33
Hyperion . . . . . 28 4.8 1 5 43
Ipateus . . . . . . 18 28.3

It thus appears that the inclinations of the planes of the orbits to the plane of the planet's equator increase as the distance from Saturn increases ; furthermore, that the increase is regular. A smooth curve represents them all.

Now let us turn to the Jovian system.

Same in Jovian system.The inner satellite, or Benjamin of the family, moves apparently in the plane of its primary's equator.