Page:United States Statutes at Large Volume 106 Part 4.djvu/263

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PUBLIC LAW 102-486—OCT. 24, 1992 106 STAT. 2999 (2) In carrying out the study to determine the nature of a uniform national label under subsection (a)(2)(B), the Federal Trade Commission shall— (A) weigh the consumer, environmental, and energy saving benefits of any element of such label against the necessity for a concise, practical, and cost-efEicient label; and (B) consider as a possible element of such label a statement suggesting consumers check the vehicle's owner's manual regarding octane requirements. (c) REPORTS. —The Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency, the Secretary of Energy, and the Chairman of the Federal Trade Commission shall transmit to the Congress, within one year after the date of the enactment of this Act, the findings, conclusions, and recommendations made as a result of the studies carried out by such officers under this section, together with a description of the administrative and legislative actions needed to implement such recommendations. TITLE XVI—GLOBAL CLIMATE CHANGE SEC. 1601. REPORT. 42 USC 13381. Not later than 2 years after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary shall submit a report to the Congress that includes an assessment of— (1) the feasibility and economic, energy, social, environmental, and competitive implications, including implications for jobs, of stabilizing the generation of greenhouse gases in the United States by the year 2005; (2) the recommendations made in chapter 9 of the 1991 National Academy of Sciences report entitled "Policy Implications of Greenhouse Warming", including an analysis of the benefits and costs of each recommendation; (3) the extent to which the United States is responding, compared with other countries, to the recommendations made in chapter 9 of the 1991 National Academy of Sciences report; (4) the feasibility of reducing the generation of greenhouse gases; (5) the feasibility and economic, energy, social, environmental, and competitive implications, including implications for jobs, of achieving a 20 percent reduction from 1988 levels in the generation of carbon dioxide by the year 2005 as recominended by the 1988 Toronto Scientific World Conference on the Changing Atmosphere; (6) the potential economic, energy, social, environmental, and competitive implications, including implications for jobs, of implementing the policies necessary to enable the United States to comply with any obligations under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change or subsequent international agreements. SEC. 1602. LEAST-COST ENERGY STRATEGY. 42 USC 13382. (a) STRATEGY.— The first National Energy Policy Plan (in this title referred to as the "Plan") under section 801 of the Department of Energy Organization Act (42 U.S.C. 7321) prepared and required to be submitted by the President to Congress after February 1, 1993, and each subsequent such Plan, shall include a least-cost