Page:United States Statutes at Large Volume 18 Part 2c.djvu/469

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462 rnenio crnnscrrns. tories on the vessels of the Republic of Liberia, or on goods imported or exported in those vessels, beyond what are or may be levied on national vessels, or on the like goods imported or exported in national vessels. Anmonn IV. Eqnsncycr duties Merchandise or goods coming from the United States of America in °¤ *'"P°'“*· any vessels, or imported in United States vessels from any country, shall not be prohibited by the Republic of Liberia, nor be subject to higher duties than are levied on the same kinds of merchandise or goods coming from any other foreign country or imported in any other foreign vessel . All articles the produce of the Republic of Liberia may be exported therefrom by citizens of the United States and United States vessels on as favorable terms as by the citizens and vessels of any other foreign country. In like manner all merchandise or goods coming from the Republic of Liberia in any vessels, or imported in Liberian vessels from any country, shall not be prohibited by the United States of America, nor be subject to higher duties than are levied on the same kinds of merchandise or goods coming from any other foreign country or imported inany other foreign vessels. All articles the produce of the United States, or of their territories, may be imported therefrom by Liberian citizens and Liberian vessels on as favorable terms as by the citizens and vessels of any other foreign country. ` Ancrromn V. WM k ¤ d ¤¤ d When any vessel of either of the contracting parties shall be wrecked, d"·'”°·8°d "°““"l°· foundered, or otherwise damaged on the coasts or within the territories of the other, the respective citizens shall receive the greatest possible aid, as well for themselves as for their vessels and effects. All possible aid shall be given to protect their property t'rom being plundered and 8°1"*8°· their persons from ill treatment. Should a dispute arise as to the salvage, it shall be settled by arbitration, to be chosen by the parties respectively. Amronn VI. Favors grunted It being the intention of the two contracting parties to bind them-

  • b‘;;’;g:'°:’:2:: **° selves by the present treaty to treat each other on the footing of the

' most favored nation, it is hereby agreed between them that any favor, privilege, or immunity whatever in matters of commerce and navigation, which either contracting party has actually granted, or may hereafter grant, to the subjects or citizens of any other State, shall be extended to the citizens of the other contracting party gratnitously, if the concession in favor of that other State shall have been gratuitous, or in return for a compensation as nearly as possible of proportionate value and effect, to be adjusted by mutual agreement, if the concession shall have been conditional. Aarrom VII. consuls. Each contracting party may appoint consuls for the protection of trade, to re ide in the dominions of the other; but no such consul shall enter upon the exercise of his functions until he shall have been approved and admitted, in the usual form, by the Government of the country to which he is sent. Aamorm VIH. _ Non-intsrtsmnce The United States Government engages never to interfere, unless "‘ L"’°'*“ """'· solicited by the Government of Liberia, in the affairs between tho BP- original inhabitants and the Government of the Republic of Liberia, in