Page:United States Statutes at Large Volume 25.djvu/1479

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1440 TREATY-TONGA. Ocrosnn 2, 1836. 0<=¤>¤<=r¥¤.1¤8¤· Treaty between the United States of America and the Kingdom of Tonga of amity, commerce and navigation. Ooncluded October 2, 1886; ratification, with amendment, advised by the Senate January 19, 1888; ratified by the President of the United States February 7, 1888; ratified by the Kirig of Tonga August 1, 1888; ratifications exchanged at Nukualofa August 1, 1888; proclaimed September 18, 1888. BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. A PROCLAMATION. Pye8mb1C_ Vlfhereas a Treaty of Amity, Commerce and Navigation, between the United States of America and the Kingdom of Tonga was concluded and signed by their respective Plenipotentiaries on board the United States Steamer “Mohican," in the harbor of Nukualofa, Tongatabu, on the second day of October, eighteen hundred and eighty- six, which Treaty, as amended, by the Senate of the United States, and being in the English and Tongan languages, is word for word as follows: Treaty of Amity, Commerce and Navigation, between the United States of America and the King of Tonga. ceuuacuugpsmes. The United States of America and the King of Tonga, mutually desirous of maintaining and strengthening their relations and interests; have resolved to conclude a treaty of amity, commerce and navigation: and to this end have empowered as their representatives: The President of the United States; George H. Bates, Special _ Commissioner of the United States to Tonga; And His Majesty, the mmpomumes. Kingcof Tonga; the Reverend Shirley Waldemar Baker, Premier of the ingdom of Tonga; Who, after producing to each other their respective powers, have agreed upon the following Articles: Anricm I. rms and muy. There shall be perpetual peace and amity between the United States of America and the King of Tonga, his heirs and his successors. ARTICLE II. _Eecipr0cal mmm The citizens of the United States shall always enjgy. in the domin- "“ "’ °*“’°'“ ions of the King of Tonga, and Tongan subjects s all always enjoy in the United States, whatever rights. privileges and immunities are ‘ now accorded to citizens or subjects of the most·favored nation; and no rights, privileges or immunities "shall be granted hereafter to any foreign state or to the citizens or subjects of any foreign state by either of the High Contracting Parties, which shall not be also equally and unconditionally granted by the same to the other High Contracting Party, its citizens or subjects; it being understood that the Parties