Page:United States Statutes at Large Volume 38 Part 2.djvu/769

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1976 PROCLAMATIONS, 1913. upper and lower points, and proceed as before, and the sum of two parts sha1l_be deemed to be the transverse area; but if the midship depth exceed 16 feet, divide each depth into 7 equal parts instead of 5, and measure, as before directed, the honzoutal breadths at the six points of division, and also at the upper pomig of the depth; number them from above, as before; multiply the second, fourth, and smth by 4, and the third and fifth by 2; add these products together, and to the sum add the iirst breadth and the seventh. Multiply the quantity thus obtained by one·third of the common interval between the breadths, and the products shall be deemed the transverse area of the u per part of the section; than find the lower Hart of the area as before directed, and adcfthe two parts together, and the sum sha be deemed to be the transverse area. This section a lies to vessels with double bottoms, the tops of which have a rise from the miggle line to each side. In vessels in which the top of the double bottom is horizontal, or in which there is no double bottom, the depths are to be divided by 4 or 6 (instead of 5 or 7), according as their midshig depths do not. or do exceed 16 feet respectively. In such cases no subdivision of e lower part is to be made. Sec. 3. Number the transverse sections or areas respectively 1, 2, 3, etc., N0. 1 being at the extreme limit of the length at the bow, or of each part of the length, the last number at the extreme limit of the length at the stem or the extreme limit at the after end of each part of the length; then, whether the length be divided according to the table into 4 or 12 parts, as in classes 1 and 5, or any intermediate number, as in classes 2, 3, and 4, multi ly the second and every evenmumbered area. by 4, and the third and every odd-numbered area (except the first and last) by 2; add these products together, and to the sum add the fast and last, if they yield anything; multiply the quantity thus obtained by one-third of the common interval between the areas, and the product will be the cubicsl contents of the space, or cubical contents of each part if the ship is measured in parts under the tonnage deck. The tonnage of this volume is obtained by dividing it by 100, if the measurements are taken iu English feet, and by 2.83 if the measurements are taken in meters. The multiplier 0.353 may be used instead of the divisor 2.83. Sec. 4. If the a third deck the tonnage of the ce between it and the tonnage deck shall e ascertained as follows: Measure iusigzt the inside length of the space at the middle of its height from the plank at the side of the stem to the lining on the timbers at the stem, and divide the length imno the same number of equal arts into which the length of the tonnage deck is divided, as above directed; measure {also at the middle of its height) the inside breadth of the space at each of the points of division, also the breadth at the stem and the breadth at the stern; number them successively 1, 2, 3, etc., commencing at the stem; multiply the second and all the other even-numbered breadths by 4. and the third and all the other odd-numbered breadths (except the first and last) by 2; to the sum of these products add the first and last breaxlths; multiply the whole sum by one-third of the common interval between the bremdths, and the result will give in superficial feet the mean horizontal area of the space; measure the mean height of the space, and multi ly by it the mean horizontal area, and the product will be the cubical contents of tlib space; divide this product by 100 (or by 2.83 if the measurements are taken in meters) and the quotient shall be deemed to be the tonnage of the space, and shall be added to the tonnage of the ship ascertained as aforesmd; and if the ship has more than three decks, the tonnage of each space between decks above the tonnage deck shall be severally ascertained in the manner above described, and shall be added to the tonnage of the ship ascertained as aforesaid. Sec. 5. If there be 2. break, a poo , or any other permanently covered or closed-in space on or above the upper deck yrs donned above in Article III) the tonnage of such space shall be sscertained as follows: Measure the internal mean length of the sggce in feet, and divide it into two equal parts; measure at the middle of its height ee inside breadths, namely, one at each end and the other at the middle of the length; then to the sum of the end breadths add four times the middle breadth, and multiply the vyhole sum by one—third of the common interval between the breadths; the product w11l_ give the mean horizontal area of the space; then measure the mean hexg t and mulmply by it the mean horizontal area; divide the product by 100 (or by 2.83 1f the measurements are taken in meters) and the quotient shall be deemed to be the tonnage of the space. $2c. 6. In measuring the length. breadth, and height of the general volume of the ship or that of the other spaces. reduce to the mean thickness the parts of the ceiling which exceed the mean thickness. When the ceiling is absent, or when it is not permanently fixed, the length and breadth shall be reckoned from the main frames of the ship, not from the_web or belt frames. The same principle is to hold in the case 0f_ deck erections, that IS, the breadth is to be reckoned from the main framing or snffeners oi the same. when ceiling is not fitted. When the main framing of the ship IS curved or earned upward and mboard so as to permit the building of fopside tanks or compartments outboard of the main framing, L e breadth of the ship shall be reckoned rrom the outboard framing of such outboard tanks, thus including these t2.11kS m the measurement.