Page:United States Statutes at Large Volume 6.djvu/103

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dollars, in full of all his claims and demands against the United States, as well for lands and rations granted by several resolutions of Congress to Canadian sufferers, as on any other account whatsoever.

Approved, July 1, 1790.


Statute II.



July 1, 1790.
Chap. XXIV.—An Act for the relief of Nathaniel Twining.

Penalty remitted to N. Twining.Be it enacted, &c., That the penalty, amounting to five hundred and sixty-seven dollars and forty-one cents, incurred by Nathaniel Twining, for a failure in neglecting to transport the mail between Charleston and Savannah, from the month of September, one thousand seven hundred and eighty-seven, until the first of January, one thousand seven hundred and eighty-eight, pursuant to a contract made with the late postmaster-general, shall be, and the same is hereby remitted.

Approved, July 1, 1790.


Statute II.



Aug. 4, 1790.
Chap. XXXVII.—An Act for the relief of John Stewart and John Davidson.

Remission of duty on a certain quantity of salt.Be it enacted, &c., That so much of the duties accruing on eighteen hundred bushels of salt, imported in the ship Mercury, into the port of Annapolis, in the state of Maryland, some time in the month of April last, on account of Messieurs John Stewart and John Davidson, as relates to thirteen hundred and twenty-five bushels thereof, which were casually destroyed by a flood on the night of the same day on which the said salt was landed and stored, shall be, and the same are hereby remitted.

Approved, August 4, 1790.


Statute II.



Aug. 11, 1790.
Chap. XLIV.—An Act for the relief of disabled soldiers and seamen lately in the service of the United States, and of certain other persons.

Persons entitled to pensions, and at what rate.Be it enacted, &c., That Stephen Califfe, Jeremiah Ryan, Joseph M’Gibbon, Samuel Garretson, Ephraim M’Coy, Christian Kuhn, David Steele, Joseph Shuttlief, and Daniel Culver, disabled soldiers lately in the service of the United States, be allowed pensions at the rate of five dollars per month from the time their pay in the army respectively ceased. That Christian Wolfe, a disabled soldier, be allowed a pension at the rate of four dollars per month from the date of his discharge. That Edward Scott, a disabled soldier, be allowed a pension at the rate of three dollars per month from the date of his discharge. That David Weaver and George Schell, disabled soldiers, be each allowed a pension, at the rate of two dollars per month, from the date of their respective discharges. That Seth Boardman, a disabled soldier, be allowed a pension, at the rate of three dollars and one-third of a dollar per month, from the seventeenth day of March, one thousand seven hundred and eighty-six. That Severinus Koch, a disabled captain of Colonel Jacob Klock’s regiment of New York militia, be allowed a pension, at the rate of five dollars per month, from the twentieth day of August, one thousand seven hundred and seventy-seven. That John Younglove, a disabled major, of Colonel Lewis Van Woort’s regiment of New York militia, be allowed a pension, at the rate of six dollars per month, from the thirtieth day of July, one thousand seven hundred and eighty-one. That William White, a disabled private of Colonel Williams’ regiment of New York militia, be allowed a pension, at the rate of three dollars and one-third of a dollar per month, from the first day of April, one thousand seven hundred and eighty-six. That Jacob Newkerk, a disabled soldier of Colonel John Harper’s regiment of New York state troops, be allowed a pension, at the rate of three dollars per month, from the twenty-second day of October, one thousand seven hundred and eighty.