Page:Woman in the Nineteenth Century 1845.djvu/11

From Wikisource
Jump to: navigation, search
This page needs to be proofread.


WOMAN

in the

NINETEENTH CENTURY.


"Frailty, thy name is Woman."

"The Earth waits for her Queen."


The connection between these quotations may not be obvious, but it is strict. Yet would any contradict us, if we made them applicable to the other side, and began also

"Frailty, thy name is Man."

"The Earth waits for its King."

Yet man, if not yet fully installed in his powers, has given much earnest of his claims. Frail he is indeed, how frail! how impure! Yet often has the vein of gold displayed itself amid the baser ores, and Man has appeared before us in princely promise worthy of his future.

If, oftentimes, we see the prodigal son feeding on the husks in the fair field no more his own, anon, we raise the eyelids, heavy from bitter tears, to behold in him the radiant apparition of genius and love, demanding not less than the all of goodness, power and beauty. We see that in him the largest claim finds a due foundation. That claim is for no partial sway, no exclusive possession. He cannot be satisfied with any one gift of life, any one department of know-