Public Opinion

From Wikisource
Jump to: navigation, search
Public Opinion  (1922) 
by Walter Lippmann
Public Opinion is a 1922 book on media and democracy by Walter Lippmann. Among other things, it argues that 20-th century advances in the technology of "the manufacture of consent" amount to "a revolution" in "the practice of democracy" because this allows the control over public opinion about the world and about the public's interests in that world. Control of public opinion is a means to controlling public behavior.Excerpted from Public Opinion on Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
Dedication
Part I. Introduction
Chapter I. The World Outside And The Pictures In Our Heads
Part II. Approaches To The World Outside
Chapter II. Censorship And Privacy
Chapter III. Contact And Opportunity
Chapter IV. Time And Attention
Chapter V. Speed, Words, And Clearness
Part III. Stereotypes
Chapter VI. Stereotypes
Chapter VII. Stereotypes As Defense
Chapter VIII. Blind Spots And Their Value
Chapter IX. Codes And Their Enemies
Chapter X. The Detection Of Stereotypes
Part IV. Interests
Chapter XI. The Enlisting Of Interest
Chapter XII. Self-Interest Reconsidered
Part V. The Making Of A Common Will
Chapter XIII. The Transfer Of Interest
Chapter XIV. Yes Or No
Chapter XV. Leaders And The Rank And File
Part VI. The Image Of Democracy
Chapter XVI. The Self-Centered Man
Chapter XVII. The Self-Contained Community
Chapter XVIII. The Role Of Force, Patronage, and Privilege
Chapter XIX. The Old Image In A New Form: Guild Socialism
Chapter XX. A New Image
Part VII. Newspapers
Chapter XXI. The Buying Public
Chapter XXII. The Constant Reader
Chapter XXIII. The Nature Of News
Chapter XXIV. News, Truth, And A Conclusion
Part VIII. Organized Intelligence
Chapter XXV. The Entering Wedge
Chapter XXVI. Intelligence Work
Chapter XXVII. The Appeal To The Public
Chapter XXVIII. The Appeal To Reason