Sartor Resartus

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Sartor Resartus: The Life and Opinions of Herr Teufelsdröckh  (1833) 
by Thomas Carlyle
Thomas Carlyle's major work, Sartor Resartus (meaning 'The tailor re-tailored'), first published as a serial in 1833-34, purported to be a commentary on the thought and early life of a German philosopher called Diogenes Teufelsdröckh (which translates as 'god-born devil-dung'), author of a tome entitled "Clothes: their Origin and Influence." Teufelsdröckh's Transcendentalist musings are mulled over by a skeptical English editor who also provides fragmentary biographical material on the philosopher. The work is, in part, a parody of Hegel, and of German Idealism more generally. — Excerpted from Sartor Resartus on Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

Book I

Book II

Book III


This work was published before January 1, 1923, and is in the public domain worldwide because the author died at least 100 years ago.