Statutes in Force/Guide to the Edition/1 June 1972

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Statutes in Force
by The United Kingdom
Note:(1) The words "[Page 2 is blank]" and similar references do not appear in the original. (2) The page numbers are at the bottom of the page.

Statutes in Force

Official Revised Edition

Guide to the Edition

with a Foreword by the Lord Chancellor

1st June 1972

LONDON

HER MAJESTY'S STATIONERY OFFICE

17p net

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FOREWORD

by

The Right Honourable Lord Hailsham of St. Marylebone

Lord High Chancellor of Great Britain

The Third Edition of Statutes Revised was published in 1950 under the supervision of the Statute Law Committee as part of the program of statute law reform inaugurated soon after the end of the last war. At that time it was recognised that a further edition would be needed when the projected work on consolidation and statute law revision had borne some fruit. The time has now been reached when a large amount of consolidation and revision has been done. The combined effect of this work and of the ordinary legislation passed since 1950 has been to repeal or amend a large part of the Acts contained in the Third Edition. The Committee has therefore decided to undertake the publication of a new official revised edition of the statutes.

The three editions of Statutes Revised published between 1885 and 1950 were bound collections of the Public General Acts as amended. The Third Edition and the succeeding annual volumes were supplemented by an annual noter-up service which provided details of subsequent amendments and repeals. This was a useful service, but noting up is a laborious process and can easily be a source of error.

The new edition is renamed Statutes in Force. It is designed as a self-renewing, self-expanding and thus permanent edition. The Acts will be printed as separate booklets and assembled in loose-leaf binders. In this way it will be possible to keep the new edition up to date without disfiguring the text.

It is to be an official edition of the statutes currently in force and is published by authority. An Editorial Board is responsible for developing the work until it includes all Public General Acts in force, and for keeping it continuously up-to-date.

The new edition offers an arrangement by subject-matter. Those who require all the statutes currently in force will be best served by the complete edition so arranged. But those whose interest is limited and who require part only of the statute law do not have to buy the whole work. They will be able to make do with their own selection.

Statutes in Force is designed to meet the obligation of the State to provide an accurate and up-to-date text of all statutes currently in force, edited in a helpful and comprehensive way, but without commentary. I hope that both the new edition and its fresh approach will prove equally useful to the profession and the public. As ex officio President of the Statute Law Committee I wish it every success.

Hailsham of St. Marylebone

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CONTENTS

page

Contents of the Edition ... ... ... ... ... ... 7

Arrangement of the Acts ... ... ... ... ... 7

Source of the Text ... ... ... ... ... ... 8

Arrangements of Sections ... ... ... ... ... 9

Amendments ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 9

Repeals ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 11

Blanket Repeals and Substitutions ... ... ... ... 12

Omissions under Statutory Authority ... ... ... ... 12

Lists of Omissions ... ... ... ... ... ... 13

Annotations ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 14

(a) General ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 14
(b) Footnotes ... ... ... ... ... ... 14
(c) Crossnotes ... ... ... ... ... ... 14
(d) Notes in Statutes of the Realm ... ... ... 15

Marginal Notes and References ... ... ... ... 16

Date of Royal Assent ... ... ... ... ... ... 16

Regnal Year ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 16

Short Titles ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 16

Running Head ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 16

Territorial Extent of an Act ... ... ... ... ... 16

Dating of the Text ... ... ... ... ... ... 17

Subordinate Legislation ... ... ... ... ... ... 17

Indexes and Lists of Acts ... ... ... ... ... 17

Keeping the Edition up to date ... ... ... ... 17

Suggestions ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 18

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SF-B

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STATUTES IN FORCE

Official Revised Edition

Contents of the Edition

This Edition contains the Public General Acts for the time being in force in the United Kingdom or some part of the United Kingdom (including Acts of the Parliament of Scotland and selected Acts of the Parliament of Ireland but not Acts of the Parliament of Northern Ireland) and Measures of the National Assembly or General Synod of the Church of England for the time being in force, but (with a few exceptions) not

(a) Consolidated Fund Acts, Appropriation Acts, Expiring Laws Acts, Statute Law Revision Acts and Statute Law (Repeals) Acts
(b) Acts or parts of Acts of a local or personal nature
(c) Acts or parts of Acts extending to Northern Ireland, but to neither England and Wales nor Scotland, which deal with matters placed within the competence of the Parliament of Northern Ireland and were passed before the 3rd May 1921 (which is the day appointed for the purposes of section 6 of the Government of Ireland Act 1920 (c. 67))
(d) Acts or parts of Acts extending only to territory outside of the United Kingdom.

The Edition includes Acts which have not yet come into force.

Arrangement of the Acts

Acts are arranged in groups and subgroups according to their subject-matter. Within groups and subgroups, Acts are arranged in chronological order.

Where an Act deals with more than one subject the following rules are observed

(a) if the Act is mainly concerned with one subject, it is grouped according to that subject and not according to any of the other subjects with which it deals
(b) if the Act deals with a number of related subjects within the subject-matter of a single group, without being mainly concerned with any one of them, it is allocated to a general subgroup within that group
(c) if the Act deals with a number of miscellaneous or otherwise unrelated subjects and is not mainly concerned with any one of them, the provisions relating to each subject are sometimes separated and allocated to the group to which they belong; examples are the Finance Acts and some of the Law Reform (Miscellaneous Provisions) Acts. Such separations are kept to a minimum, and wherever they occur the Act is printed in each of the

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groups in such a form as to include its long title, the provisions relating to its citation, commencement and extent and any other general provisions, including those relating to its application or interpretation so far as they are material.

Certain Acts are included in each of the groups or subgroups with whose subject-matter they deal; for example, an Act which deals with the subject matter of both an English and a Scottish group or subgroup may be included in both.

The Acts are desinged to be kept in binders issued for the purpose; a blue divider sheet is provided to mark the beginning of each group and a yellow divider sheet to mark the beginning of each subgroup. A group divider sheet carries a list of the Acts in the group, except where there are subgroups, in which case the Acts are listed on the subgroup divider sheets and the group divider sheet carries only the name of the group and the names of the subgroups in numerical order.

The arrangement of the Acts may be altered in the future to meet, for instance, the introduction of new topics of legislation.

If the reader wishes to place the Acts in some different order of his own choosing, there is nothing to prevent his doing so.

Source of the Text

The text of the Acts of the Parliament at Westminster down to the end of the year 1713 is taken from the collection entitled The Statutes of the Realm, printed by command of His Majesty King George the Third in pursuance of an Address of the House of Commons of Great Britain, from Original Records and Authentic Manuscripts. The introduction to that work describes the instruments and other material comprised in the work and their arrangement, and gives an explanation of the principles governing their selection, with particulars of the different sources from which the material was taken and the rules observed in their use. There is a chapter on the original language of the ancient charters and statutes and the translations used for the work; in an appendix to the introduction may be found a catalogue of earlier printed collections, translations and abridgements of the statutes, and a table of original records and manuscript copies of the great charters and of the statutes specifying the repositories in which they were preserved, followed by an explanation of the contractions used in printing the records and manuscripts copied in the collection.

From 1714 to 1800 the text is based on the collection of statutes known as The Statutes at Large by Owen Ruffhead, and from 1801 to 1869 on the collection of statutes known as The Statutes of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. From 1870 to the present time the text is based on the bound volumes of statutes known variously as The Public General Statutes, The Public General Acts, and (since 1926) The Public General Acts and Measures.

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A revised and extended edition of The Statutes at Large by Charles Runnington first appeared in 1786. Between that edition and The Statutes of the Realm there are variances with respect to years, statutes and chapters, and a table of these variances will be found at the beginning of the Chronological Table of the Statutes published annually by authority.

The text of the Acts of the Parliaments of Scotland is taken from the Second Revised Edition of The Acts of the Parliaments of Scotland 1424-1707. Prepared by the Scottish Parliamentary Draftsmen and published by authority in 1966, the Second Revised Edition was based on the First Revised Edition published in 1908 which in turn was based on the collection of Acts known as the Record Edition. The year and chapter number of each Act as given in the Record Edition are printed on the title page of the Act, and to facilitate reference to the collection known as the Duodecimo Edition the year and chapter number as given in that edition (which are often different) are added in square brackets. Acts of the Parliaments of Scotland are distinguished in this Edition by the letter [S] printed on the title page immediately after the short title.

The text of the Acts of the Parliament of Ireland is taken from the Revised Edition of the The Irish Statutes prepared by Wm. F. Cullinan and published by authority in 1885. These Acts are distinguished in this Edition by the letter [I] printed on the title page immediately after the short title.

Arrangements of Sections

Every Act containing ten or more sections is preceded by an arrangement of sections reproducing, as in the Queen's Printer's copy, the marginal notes of the various sections of the Act and the cross-headings of the Act, and its schedules (if any).

If a marginal note is not a reliable guide to the current text, this is signified by a dagger, both in the arrangement of sections and in the body of the Act.

Where a section has been omitted from the text because it has been wholly repealed or for some other reason, its marginal note is not included in the arrangement of sections, but where a repealed section is printed in small because it is necessary for the understanding of the surviving text, its marginal note is included in the arrangement of sections, also in small type.

Where an Act has been amended by the addition, insertion or substitution of a new section without a marginal note, the arrangement of sections gives only the number of the section.

Amendments

Every Act contained in this Edition incorporates amendments made up to the date printed on its title page (subject to what is said below as to Northern Ireland).

Where the amendment has been made textually by the addition, insertion or substitution of a new provision or new words, it is

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incorporated in the text and accounted for in a footnote. The new provision or new words are enclosed in square brackets with a figure referring to the footnote, so that what has been added, inserted or substituted can be clearly seen.

Where new words have been substituted for other words in a provision but the substitution is partial, that is to say, the original words remain in force either in part of the territory to which they originally extended or for certain restricted purposes, then either

(a) both the original words and the words which have been substituted for them are enclosed in square brackets with a figure referring to a footnote explaining the substitution and stating in which part of the United Kingdom the substituted words have efect or for what purposes they do or do not have effect

or, if the text as so amended would be difficult to read,

(b) the provision is printed in its original form with an asterisk referring to a crossnote stating that the provision has been amended in its application to part of the territory or for certain purposes, and the provision is printed again in its amended form and enclosed in square brackets with a figure referring to a footnote stating in which part of the United Kingdom it has effect in its amended form or for what purposes it does or does not have effect in that form.

Where a self-contained provision has been substituted for another self-contained provision and the substitution is partial, the substitution is also indicated and accounted for in this alternative way, except where the partial substition has been effected by another provision of the same Act, such as a section amending the Act in its application to Scotland, in which case the amending section is left to speak for itself.

Where the amendment is made otherwise than textually, attention is drawn to it in a crossnote.

Where an Act which extends to Northern Ireland has been amended either by the Parliament of Northern Ireland or by Her Majesty by Order in Council in the exercise of the powers conferred by section 1(3) of the Northern Ireland (Temporary Provisions) Act 1972 (c. 22), the following special rules apply

(a) if the Act deals with a matter which is within the powers of the Parliament of Northern Ireland and was passed before the 3rd May 1921, neither is the amendment incorporated in the text nor is attention drawn to it in a crossnote (for such amendments reference should be made to The Statutes Revised, Northern Ireland and the Chronological Table of the Statutes Affecting Northern Ireland)
(b) if the Act was passed on or after the 3rd May 1921, crossnote draws attention to the amendment except where it is textual and its effect is to alter the law of England and

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Wales or Scotland, in which case the amendment is incorporated in the text and accounted for in a footnote as though it had been made by the Parliament at Westminster.
(c) if the Parliament of Northern Ireland in the exercise of a specific power given by the Parliament at Westminster has amended an Act of that Parliament which deals with a matter not otherwise within the powers of the Parliament of Northern Ireland, the amendment is incorporated as though it had been made by the Parliament at Westminster.

Repeals

Generally, where provisions or words have been wholly repealed, they are omitted, and if nothing has been substituted a row of dots is printed in their place. The omission is accounted for

(a) if it is a self contained provision which has been repealed, in the list of omissions at the end of the Act
(b) otherwise, in a footnote

In the following cases what has been repealed is not omitted

(a) where the repeal is partial, so that what has been repealed remains in force either in part of the territory to which it originally extended or for certain restricted purposes, in which case if what has been repealed is a self-contained provision it is printed with an asterisk referring to a crossnote stating the extent of the repeal, or if words not amounting to a self-contained provision, the words are enclosed in square brackets with a figure referring to a footnote giving the same information
(b) where what has been repealed is needed for the understanding of the surviving text, in which case it is printed in small type with a figure referring to a footnote which explains why it is printed notwithstanding the repeal, unless it is a preamble in which case the explanation appears in a crossnote under the long title.

In the following cases what has been repealed is omitted without a row of dots being printed in its place, but a crossnote drawing attention to the omission is placed under the long title of the Act

(a) preambles repealed by Statute Law Revision Acts passed before 1890 or after 1953
(b) words of enactment and certain other words and expressions having no practical effect which have been repealed by various Statute Law Revision Acts
(c) words barring the allowance in any action or proceeding of any essoin or privilege or protection or wager of law or imparlance or of bail or mainprise or benefit of clergy, and the words "that part of Britain called" or "that part of the United Kingdom called", or words to the like

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effect, where used before the words "England", "Scotland" or "Ireland", repealed wherever occurring by section 4 of the Statute Law Revision Act 1948 (c. 62).

Where a preamble is omitted in these cases, its purport may be summarised in the crossnote.

Where the Parliament of Northern Ireland or Her Majesty by Order in Council in the exercise of the powers conferred by section 1(3) of the Northern Ireland (Temporary Provisions) Act 1972 (c. 22) has repealed an Act which extends to Northern Ireland and was passed on or after the 3rd May 1921, attention is drawn to the repeal in a crossnote under the long title (for repeals of Acts passed before the 3rd May 1921 reference should be made to The Statutes Revised, Northern Ireland and the Chronological Table of the Statutes Affecting Northern Ireland.

Blanket Repeals and Substitutions

Where a number of Acts each of which contains the same provision or the same word or expression in a particular context have been amended by the repeal of that provision, word or expression or by the substitution of a new provision, word or expression and the Acts have been amended as a class and not individually, it may not be practicable to discover every instance; but with this reservation and subject to what is said as to the repeal of certain words and expressions by various Statute Law Revision Acts, these 'blanket' amendments if textual are incorporated in the text and accounted for in footnotes, or if they are not textual attention is drawn to them in crossnotes in the same way as amendments which have been made individually.

Omissions under Statutory Authority

The following are omitted under the authority of section 3 of the Statute Law Revision Act 1948 (c. 62)

(a) words of enactment (except where they have meaning for the text), and words referring to or consequential on them
(b) clauses of attestation added to ancient statutes
(c) in any enactment relating to courts now merged in the Supreme Court, the words "debt", "suit", "bill", "plaint" or "proceeding" occurring after or in connection with the word "action"
(d) in any enactment relating to Scotland, the word "stewartry" occurring in connection with the words "shire", "sheriffdom" or "county", and the word "stewart" occuring in connection with the word "sheriff"
(e) the words "of", "and" or "or" where used in connection with the words specified in the last two paragraphs.

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Certain preambles also are omitted under the authority of various Statute Law Revision Acts passed between 1890 and 1953 inclusive unless they are needed for the understanding of the surviving text, in which case they are printed in normal type.

None of these omissions is indicated in the text, but a crossnote drawing attention to the omission is placed under the long title of the Act. Where a preamble is omitted, its purport may be summarised in the crossnote.

Lists of Omissions

At the end of each Act is a list of all the self-contained provisions which have been omitted from the text on the ground that

(a) they have been wholly repealed
(b) they repeal or textually amend other provisions
(c) their effect is spent
(d) they are irrelevant because they deal with a subject outside the scope of the group
(e) they are outside the scope of the work as a whole.

Rows of dots are printed in the place of these provisions; the numbers assigned to them and the letters, if any, are retained in the text, and each entry in the list gives the number and the letter, if any, of the omitted provision, the reason for its omission and such further particulars as are likely to help the reader. For example, the entry relating to a provision which is omitted because it textually amends other provisions may state what those provisions are. Where the provision which is omitted has been repealed and is specified in a schedule, the entry does not cite the section introducing the schedule unless it contains some saving or exception or its operation is otherwise expressly limited, in which case the entry cites the section with the schedule. The fact that a repeal is subject to a saving is not always disclosed: common savings such as those excepting subordinate legislation from the effect of the repeal, and savings which are transitional, are not generally mentioned, and there may be other savings of importance in particular circumstances for which reference must be made to the provisions containing them.

The omission of certain provisions such as parts of an amendments schedule which are not self-contained may also be accounted for in the list of omissions and not in a footnote. Not all provisions which repeal or textually amend other provisions are omitted from the text; for example, if a provision explains why it has repealed a certain enactment or contains an exception, it is printed for the information of the reader.

Where the substantive provisions of an Act have all been omitted from the text, the Act is nevertheless printed in such a form as to include its long title, the provisions relating to its citation, commencement and extent and any other general

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provisions, including those relating to its application or interpretation which are contained in the Act.

The list of omissions cites Acts by their short titles (if any) and chapter numers.

Annotations

(a) General

The annotations are of two kinds: crossnotes which appear in the body of the text and footnotes which appear below it. Crossnotes and footnotes serve different purposes which are explained more fully below, but the broad distinction between them is that footnotes account for amendments of the text itself, whereas crossnotes draw attention to other provisions which do not amend the text and yet affect the Act. In other words, footnotes give the authority for printing the text as it is, whereas crossnotes contain warnings against treating the text as definitive.

(b) Footnotes

As has been said, footnotes give the authority for printing the text as it is; they explain why the text is in its present form wherever it has been amended (otherwise than by the total repeal of a self-contained provision which, being entered in the list of omissions, does not need to be accounted for in a footnote).

Footnotes indicate the nature of an amendment by stating whether it is a repeal, a substitution, an insertion or an addition, and they are printed in roman type at the foot of the page containing the amendments to which they relate.

Where an amendment has effect in part only of the territory to which the amended provision extends, that part is indicated by means of the initial letters of the countries it comprises enclosed in brackets.

Where the amendment is specified in a schedule, the footnote does not cite the section introducing the schedule unless it contains some saving or exception or its operation is otherwise expressly limited, in which case the footnote cites the section with the schedule. The fact that a repeal is subject to a saving is not always disclosed: common savings and savings which are transitional are not generally mentioned, and there may be other savings of importance in particular circumstances for which reference must be made to the enactment itself.

Where an amendment is not yet in force, the abbreviation prosp., meaning that it is prospective, appears in brackets immediately after the word indicating the nature of the amendment, and the abbreviation temp. is employed for amendments which are temporary.

(c) Crossnotes

As has been said, crossnotes contain warnings against treating the text as definitive. Where a provision is affected by some other

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provision which does not textually amend it, a crossnote gives a warning of this fact by briefly describing the wayin which the one provision operates on the other, and only exceptionally will more information be given.

Crossnotes are printed in italic type. They are placed as follows

(i) if relating to the Act as a whole or to a number of its provisions, under the long title
(ii) if relating to a numbered Part of the Act, under the cross-heading describing its subject matter
(iii) if relating to a section of the Act, under that section
(iv) if relating to a schedule to the Act, under the cross-heading of that schedule
(v) if relating to a numbered Part of a schedule, under the cross-heading of that Part
(vi) if relating to a paragraph of a schedule, under that paragraph

If there is more than one crossnote relating to the same section or other part of an Act, the crossnotes appear in chronological order.

Where the provision cited by the crossnote has effect in part only of the territory to which the provision on which it operates extends, that part is indicated by means of the initial letters of the countries it comprises enclosed in brackets.

Where the style and title of a Minister of the Crown or other person or body referred to in the text has been changed, a crossnote gives the new style and title. If the functions or some of the functions formerly exercisable by a Minister or other person or body have been transferred, a crossnote names the person or body by whom those functions are now exercisable. Intermediate changes are not shown in are not shown in either case, but the enactments or instruments effecting the successive changes are all cited to assist the reader.

(d) Notes in Statutes of the Realm

At foot of the text on each page of The Statutes of the Realm there were added such variant readings as appeared necessary to correct its errors or to supply its deficiences, or to reconcile any material contradiction or repugnance between the text and the translation or between diferrent copies of the text where they were of equal authority, with particulars of the records or manuscripts or printed copies in which they were found. The introduction to The Statutes of the Realm explains the manner in which the variant readings are indicated in the text and noted for the information of the reader, and it also explains how variant translations and translations of doubtful authority or accuracy are shown. These notes are reproduced in this Edition so far as they are still material, and both the text and its translation are marked as in The Statutes of the Realm with such changes as the style and format of the present Edition appear to require.

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Marginal Notes and References

Marginal notes are printed in their original form, except that the use of capital letters conforms with modern practice. Where the marginal notes are not a reliable guide to the current text, this is signified by a dagger, and a crossnote explaining the meaning of this symbol is placed under the long title.

Where the text of an Act refers to another Act by its short title, a reference to the year and chapter number of that other Act and, in certain cases, the regnal year or years of the Parliamentary session in which it received the Royal Assent is printed in the margin, but where it is cited with other Acts by a collective title, there is no marginal reference.

Date of Royal Assent

The date on which an Act received the Royal Assent is printed (in square brackets) immediately after the long title of the Act, in accordance with the Acts of Parliament (Commencement) Act 1793 (c. 13).

Regnal Year

The regnal year or years of the Parliamentary session in which before 1963 an Act (other than an Act of the Parliaments of Scotland) received the Royal Assent are printed on its title page. In footnotes, crossnotes, lists of omissions and marginal references, the regnal year or years are referred to only if the Act cited received the Royal Assent in the second or subsequent session of the calendar year in which it was passed.

Short Titles

Where an Act has been given a short title since its enactment (for instance, by the Short Titles Act 1896 (c. 14) or the Statute Law Revision Act 1948 (c. 62)), attention is drawn to this fact in a crossnote under the long title. Where an Act cites or refers to another Act otherwise than by its short title, the short title is substituted for this citation or reference under the authority of section 3 of the Statute Law Revision Act 1893 (c. 14).

Running Head

At the top of each page is printed the short title of the Act, its chapter number and the numbers of the Parts, sections, schedules and Parts of schedules which appear wholly or partly on the individual page.

Territorial Extent of an Act

On the title page of each Act are printed in the bottom right-hand corner letters indicating the Acts territorial extent, namely

U.K. for the United Kingdom
E.W. for England and Wales
S. for Scotland
N.I. for Northern Ireland

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These may appear in combination (except for U.K.). They are meant primarily as a guid for purchasers and should not be taken as indicating the application of any particular part of an Act.

Where an Act extends to Northern Ireland because it contains a provision conferring on the Parliament of Northern Ireland or on Her Majesty the power to make laws for Northern Ireland, it is shown as extending to Northern Ireland notwithstanding that it contains no other provision extending to Northern Ireland.

Where there is doubt whether an Act extends to a particular part of the United Kingdom, it is nevertheless shown as extending to that part; and an Act is shown as extending to a particular part of the United Kingdom however small its application is.

An Act is shown as extending to Northern Ireland notwithstanding that the Act is such that it does not incorporate amendments effected by the Parliament of Northern Ireland or by Her Majesty, but a crossnote stating that the Act in its application to Northern Ireland has effect subject to any such amendments is placed under the long title.

Dating of the Text

As has been said, the date up to which amendments have been incorporated in an Act is prinnted on its title page. Indexes, general lists of Acts, annual supplements and companion lists of subordinate legislation bear corresponding dates.

Subordinate Legislation

For each group (or in some cases each subgroup of a group) there is a companion list of the general Statutory Rules & Orders and Statutory Instruments in force under the Acts in the group (or subgroup), and this list is generally arranged by Acts placed in chronological order and by enabling sections in numerical order.

Indexes and Lists of Acts

Each group has its own index except for a few large groups each subgroup of which may have its own index. When the work is complete there will also be an index to the work as a whole.

At the end of every index is a list of cross-references to relevant enactments which have not been cited in any relevant crossnote.

The Edition contains the following general lists of Acts in the groups so far published

(a) an alphabetical list
(b) a chronological list

The alphabetical list of Acts gives the group and subgroup of each Act, its territorial extent and the date up to which amendments have been incorporated in it.

Keeping the Edition up to date

This is done by issuing

(a) newly-enacted Acts solely or principally concerned with the subject-matter of groups already published, printed in the style and format of the Edition

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(b) new editions of Acts which have been so extensively amended as to require replacement in their amended form
(c) an annual cumulative supplement divided into parts, each complete in itself and confined to a single published group and containing
(i) separate lists of newly-enacted Acts that have been allocated to the group, Acts that have not been so allocated but which affect Acts in the group, Acts in the group that have been wholly repealed and Acts in the group of which new editions have been issued
(ii) textual amendments which have not yet been incorporated in the Acts in the group, any necessary corrections of the Edition, and notes of provisions of newly-enacted Acts that affect Acts in the group, including provisions that have repealed Acts in the group.
(d) revised general lists of Acts and indexes as required.

Suggestions

Communications regarding this work should be addressed to the Editor, Statutory Publications Office, Queen Anne's Chambers, 41 Tothill Street, London SW1H 9JX

Printed in England for Her Majesty's Stationery Office by McCorquodale Printers Ltd. London

HM 4765 Dd 139942 K 40 7/72 McC 3336/2

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© Crown copyright 1972

SBN 11 800150 7

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