Ten Books on Architecture

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Ten Books on Architecture
by Vitruvius, translated by Morris Hicky Morgan
(Latin: De architectura "On architecture") is a treatise on architecture written by the Roman architect Vitruvius and dedicated to his patron, the emperor Caesar Augustus as a guide for building projects. The work is one of the most important sources of modern knowledge of Roman building methods as well as the planning and design of structures, both large (aqueducts, buildings, baths, harbours) and small (machines, measuring devices, instruments). He is also the prime source of the famous story of Archimedes and his bath-time discovery.

VITRUVIUS

THE TEN BOOKS ON ARCHITECTURE

TRANSLATED BY

MORRIS HICKY MORGAN, PH.D., LL.D.

LATE PROFESSOR OF CLASSICAL PHILOLOGY
IN HARVARD UNIVERSITY


WITH ILLUSTRATIONS AND ORIGINAL DESIGNS

PREPARED UNDER THE DIRECTION OF

HERBERT LANGFORD WARREN, A.M.

NELSON ROBINSON JR. PROFESSOR OF ARCHITECTURE
IN HARVARD UNIVERSITY


Harvard University Press logo 1914.png


CAMBRIDGE

HARVARD UNIVERSITY PRESS

LONDON: HUMPHREY MILFORD
OXFORD UNIVERSITY PRESS
1914


PAGE
Preface iii
Contents vii
List of Illustrations xi
Book I 3
Book II 35
Book III 69
Book IV 101
Book V 129
Book VI 167
Book VII 195
Book VIII 225
Book IX 251
Book X 281
Index 321
This is a translation and has a separate copyright status from the original text. The license for the translation applies to this edition only.
Original:
This work published before January 1, 1923 is in the public domain worldwide because the author died at least 100 years ago.
 
Translation:
This work is in the public domain in the United States because it was published before January 1, 1923. It may be copyrighted outside the U.S. (see Help:Public domain).